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The return data-type of a function,whose prototype is declared in main(), is void. It cointains an instruction return; as in

main()
{
    void create(int *p);
    *some code*
}
void create(node *list)
{
     *some code*
     return;
}

What will it return,and where will it return??

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7  
A lot of functions in my firm's codebase have "return" as the last line of void functions. I was told "It's to tell the user we're ending the function". As if reaching the end of the function wasn't already enough? –  corsiKa Oct 21 '11 at 22:07
    
does it mean that returning any integer is like ending a function,irrespctive of the value of hat integer? –  Rajesh Oct 21 '11 at 22:12
    
@glowcoder: more interestingly, your colleagues seem to admit the user (other dev, I presume) has to read the code to know what it does. –  larsmans Oct 21 '11 at 22:14
    
@GrajeshBabu, yes whenever you have a return statement the execution of that function ends, no matter the value or the type of value. –  AusCBloke Oct 21 '11 at 22:17
    
@GrajeshBabu: dev = developer –  larsmans Oct 21 '11 at 22:37

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It's not going to return anything, you might have return statements in a void function to kind of alter the flow and exit from the function. ie rather than:

void do_something(int i)
{
   if (i > 1) {
      /* do something */
   }
   /* otherwise do nothing */
}

you might have:

void do_something(int i)
{
   if (i <= 1)
      return;

   /* if haven't returned, do something */
}
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In this case doesn't mean much.

return; means exit suddenly from this function returning void.

int a()
{
    return 10;
}

void b()
{
     return; // we have nothing to return, this is a void function.
}

void c()
{
    // we don't need return; it is optional.
}

return; for a void function is not useful, it can be omitted, is optional. However sometime it is useful, for example, for exiting a loop or a switch.

void xxx()
{
    int i = 0;
    while (1)
    {
        if (++i >= 100)
            return; // we exit from the function when we get 100.
    }
}
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return; won't return anything, which matches the declared void return type of the function create. It will return to the caller of the function it appears in (not shown in your example), just like return EXPRESSION; will.

In this particular piece of code, return; is redundant since it appears at the very end of create, but it's useful when you want to exit a function prematurely:

void print_error(char const *errmsg)
{
    if (errmsg == NULL)
        // nothing to print
        return;
    perror(errmsg);
}
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it will return from the executing function with a void return value (which means no value).

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this is the rule! and every type is something, like

int

like

double

ok according to this rule! numbers,or strings comes first, the compiler first knows 1,2,3,4..etc and than it process it as int or double etc..So how compiler knows unknowns simply it signs them as void
think like that, 1,2,3... all numbers already knowns by compiler but if you want to use them you just wrap it like int, or double etc. So if you have something like type what it means nothing what you can inform?
then you have to inform it like

void

so there are 2 functions, return some type, or return no type!

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