Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am a beginner so please bear with me.

I am trying to pass a string variable inside asp.net MVC. I use breakpoints so I see that it does go to the correct method in the controller, but the variables posted are equal to null.

My markup:

@{
    ViewBag.Title = "TestForm";
}

<h2>TestForm</h2>

@using (Html.BeginForm()) {
   <input type="text" id="testinput" />

    <input type="submit" value="TestForm" />
}

My controller:

public ActionResult TestForm()
{
    return View();
} 

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult TestForm(string testinput)
{
    Response.Write("[" + testinput + "]");

    return View();
}

I put the breakpoint inside the second TestForm method and testinput is null.... Am I missing something?

Note: I realize that most of the time I will be using the model to pass data around, but I would like to know that I can pass strings as well.

As part of the same question, how do I pass several variables? Would the method in my controller look like this:

[HttpPost]
public ActionResult TestForm(string var1, var2)
{
}
share|improve this question
up vote 14 down vote accepted

For me it looks like that you set the id not the name. I use MVC3 every day, so i dont reproduce your sample. (I am awake for 20 hours programming ;) but still motivated to help ) Please tell me if it dont work. But for me it looks like you have to set the "name" property ... not the id property. Try that ... i am waiting right now to help you if it does not work.

     <input type="text" id="testinput" name="testinput" />
share|improve this answer
    
yep it worked!hmmmm. why did MS decide to rely on a name and not ID????why do they always do it backwards???? But thanks! – sarsnake Oct 21 '11 at 23:46
6  
No, Microsoft do really great with mvc, dont think about microsoft about that. Its about web-standards. Basicly the id property is used to apply javascript (getElementsById, CSS-StyleSheets, jQuery and more). The name property is relevant for posts and async (data-driven) things. – dknaack Oct 21 '11 at 23:52
4  
@sarsnake - this has nothing to do with Microsoft. The browser is posting the values to the server. The name field is used in html forms and always has been. The reason is that you can only have one item with any given ID, but several things can have the same name. This makes it easy to create lists of items. Don't complain about Microsoft for something that you don't actually understand. – Erik Funkenbusch Oct 22 '11 at 2:31
7  
the last sentence could have been omitted. You are rude. – sarsnake Oct 24 '11 at 16:36
1  
Couldn't figure this out all morning and you helped me out. Thanks for this dknaack! – hardba11 Jan 15 '13 at 21:03

On a slightly separate note there is nothing wrong with passing variables like you are, but a more efficient way would be to pass around a strongly typed view model allowing you to take advantage of many aspects of MVC's goodness:

  • strongly-typed views
  • MVC Model Binding
  • Html Helpers

Create a new view model:

public class TestModel
{
    public string TestInput { get; set; }
}

Your test controller:

    [HttpGet]
    public ActionResult TestForm()
    {
        return View();
    }

    [HttpPost]
    public ActionResult TestForm(FormCollection collection)
    {
        var model = new TestModel();
        TryUpdateModel(model, collection);

        Response.Write("[" + model.TestInput + "]");

        return View();
    }

Your view:

@model <yourproject>.Models.TestModel

@{
    Layout = null;
}

<!DOCTYPE html>

<html>
<head>
    <title>TestForm</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div>
        @using(Html.BeginForm())
        {
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.LabelFor(m => m.TestInput)
            </div>
            <div class="editor-label">
                @Html.TextBoxFor(m => m.TestInput)
            </div>
            <input type="submit" value="Test Form"/>
        }
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
1  
If you are preaching about strongly typed views, why would you rely on the formCollection in your POST action method. Shouldn't it be public ActionResult TestForm(TestModel model)? – Tommy Oct 22 '11 at 4:52
    
I pass a FormCollection like this for the purposes of unit testing without mocks. My test can pass a form collection to the UpdateModel call and have it map the values onto the TestModel model object. – Jesse Oct 22 '11 at 5:05

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.