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So I've been using a shadow box inset to make a inner glow kind of making the edges blurry and shadowy like for a edge burn look. I'm trying to use it for the top and bottom only and not for the left/right sides. But it's not working. I'm using it on a overflow: auto <div> so that it can scroll and have a nice effect.

Here's my css:

#content {
    font: 14px "Lucida Grande", "Lucida Sans Unicode", sans-serif; 
    line-height:1.2em;
    height: 400px;
    width: 500px;
    overflow: auto;
    float: right;
    padding: 0 10px;

    -moz-box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #000, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #000;
    -webkit-box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #000, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #000;
    box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #000, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #000;
}
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2  
Specifically, how is this not working? Nothing displays or something's out of place, etc? Also, which browsers? All? Can you throw this into jsFiddle and/or post some HTML above? –  Sparky Oct 22 '11 at 1:37
    
It doesn't display. Well as in the shadow doesn't appear. This is the jsfiddle. Hope it works ... jsfiddle.net/p3Mgn –  Razor Oct 22 '11 at 3:14
    
It's there but you can't see a black shadow on a black background. See my answer below. –  Sparky Oct 22 '11 at 3:55
    
Shadows are not supported in all browsers. –  Steve Robbins Oct 22 '11 at 4:02
1  
@stevether, true, but that's not the issue in this case. (OP tagged CSS3) –  Sparky Oct 22 '11 at 4:27
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have a black shadow on a black background so naturally, you're not going to see anything. Turning off your black background, we can see the shadows just fine...

http://jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p3Mgn/1/show

So you just need to select different shadow colors. Here are your shadows changed to white #fff...

Full Size Demo

http://jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p3Mgn/3/

-moz-box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #fff, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #fff;
-webkit-box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #fff, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #fff;
box-shadow: inset 0  8px 8px -8px #fff, inset 0 -8px 8px -8px #fff;

EDIT in response to OP's comments:

The browser is only given two colors to use in order to render a shadow.

1) The background image's color (or just background color in this case)

2) The shadow color

Wherever they're both the same, the shadow will be invisible.

To have a blurry effect using a black background, perhaps try #444 for the shadow... it looks pretty good I think...

http://jsfiddle.net/sparky672/p3Mgn/5/show/

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Hmm. That's odd well you should technically still be able to get the shadowy blur obviously not the whole thing since it is black. that really sucks I see it. I guess it does work. The reason I wanted to use it was because I like the glowing blur effect and black. I don't know how to explain it but it's like the pages you show. The effect is what I'm after and I wanted it to be black since it would create a black (or so I thought) glow blur effect. Do you have any idea how I can get that affect? I want it to be black but still have the glowing blur thing going on at the top and bottom. –  Razor Oct 22 '11 at 4:03
    
@Razor, what is odd so odd about not being able to see black on black? The browser only has two given colors to blend together in order to achieve a shadow... a black gradient blended into black is still just black. Try different colors to achieve your effect... what's wrong with white, it glows? How about something dark gray (#222) if white is too bright? (Yellow is the default glow in Photoshop.) –  Sparky Oct 22 '11 at 4:17
    
I mean I want that effect where it kind of covers the content. I don't know how to explain it. I mean odd I guess because I'm not looking at it as the shadow but more of the blurring kind of covering the content effect I want. Maybe It's not inset? Kind of like a shadow sitting on top of the content obscuring it a bit. imageshack.us/photo/my-images/560/blurc.jpg –  Razor Oct 22 '11 at 9:59
    
@Razor, In your example, box-shadow does not appear to cover the content at all. In Safari, I can clearly see that the text is on top of the shadow. –  Sparky Oct 22 '11 at 16:35
    
Yeah that's why in the beginning I thought it was weird that even though it was black it didn't show up because I thought the shadow was supposed to appear in front of the text. But now I realize it is created behind the text. Thanks for being so helpful though! –  Razor Oct 22 '11 at 19:39
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Do you want to have shadow above content to blur top and bottom? If yes then the problem is that you shadow is shown below content. You can make it above it if you set "position: relative; z-index: -1;" to content block, but then you will not be able to click or scroll it.

Easier way to achive this effect is to use :before and :after pseudoclasses and css-gradients.

Example here: http://jsfiddle.net/V96wx/2/

In my example above you will need 2 containers — one for overflow and one for fades (to make it more bulletproof). But theoretically you can do it with only 1 container, I'll write how...

First of all — how :before and :after works. Simplest way to think about them is as about 2 more elements that will be added inside parent container before and after actual content. For example: .about:before will be added inside .about container, but before actual content.

:before and :after have one required property content if you didn't add it, element will not be created. conent may have one of the following values: htmldog.com/reference/cssproperties/content. In my example it was left blank. After element is inserted you can style it as you wish by the same rules you style every other element.

To make fade in my examples I used gradient with trasparency. You can read about gradients here davidwalsh.name/css-gradients. Transparecy is done by using colors in rgba (4th digit is transparency level).

The reason why I used 2 containers in my example is because it is harder to accurately position :before and :after elements above main container without it — if you try to use realtive coordinates for them they will position rightly, but will scroll with content and if you not use position: relative on base container you will need to know this container coordinates to make positioning. It is not a problem if container height is fixed but may be tricky if it is not.

BTW: Theoretically there is an even easier way to do fade — by using css masks with gradients ( webkit.org/blog/181/css-masks ) but right now it's working only in Safari and Chrome.

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Yes that is actually what I was trying to say. I did a bad job explaining. But thank you all for being so helpful! So I just add the pseudo class :before and after to my scrolling div? Could you explain why this works and how does it? So I can learn more about the mechanics behind the usage? Thanks! –  Razor Oct 22 '11 at 10:06
    
Well, yes and no. In my example above you will need 2 containers — one for overflow and one for fades (to make it more bulletproof). But theoretically you can do it with only 1 container, I'll write how. –  Alexey Ivanov Oct 22 '11 at 14:31
    
First of all — how :before and :after works. Simplest way to think about them is as about 2 more elements that will be added inside parent container before and after actual content. For example: .about:before will be added inside .about container, but before actual content. –  Alexey Ivanov Oct 22 '11 at 14:32
    
:before and :after have one required property content if you didn't add it, element will not be created. conent may have one of the following values: htmldog.com/reference/cssproperties/content . In my example it was left blank. After element is inserted you can style it as you wish by the same rules you style every other element. –  Alexey Ivanov Oct 22 '11 at 14:32
    
To make fade in my examples I used gradient with trasparency. You can read about gradients here davidwalsh.name/css-gradients . Transparecy is done by using colors in rgba (4th digit is transparency level). –  Alexey Ivanov Oct 22 '11 at 14:32
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