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I have a very long vector of single characters i.e. somechars<-c("A","B","C","A"...) (length is somewhere in the millions)

what is the fastest way I can count the total occurrences of say "A" and "B" in this vector? I have tried using grep and lapply but they all take so long to execute.

My current solution is:

tmp<-table(somechars)
sum(tmp["A"],tmp["B"])

But this still takes a while to compute. Is there some faster way I can be doing this? Or are there any packages I can be using to that does this already faster? I've looked into the stringr package but they use a simple grep.

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1  
I assume this is related to your table(..., exclude) question. What, exactly, are you trying to do and how fast do you need it to be? –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 22 '11 at 0:21
    
@Joshua I was actually just curious how widely accepted the! Argument is throughout r.and I'm trying to count letters in a DNA sequence –  CAPSLOCK Oct 22 '11 at 13:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

I thought that this would be fastest...

sum(somechars %in% c('A', 'B'))

And, it is faster than...

sum(c(somechars=="A",somechars=="B"))

But not faster than...

sum(somechars=="A"|somechars=="B")

But this is qualified by how many comparisons you make... which brings me back to my first guess. Once you want to sum more than 2 letters using the %in% version is the fastest.

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the result with %in% is interesting, but according to my results it depends on R version. In which version of R did you measure it? –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 12:41
    
the 2nd and 3rd solutions are unnecessarilly slow, see my post. –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 12:43
    
That's very interesting. I'm going to have to try a combination of your answer and Tomas TS answer –  CAPSLOCK Oct 22 '11 at 13:38

Regular expressions are expensive. You can get the result in your question with exact comparison.

> somechars <- sample(LETTERS, 5e6, TRUE)
> sum(c(somechars=="A",somechars=="B"))
[1] 385675
> system.time(sum(c(somechars=="A",somechars=="B")))
   user  system elapsed 
  0.416   0.072   0.487 

UPDATED to include timings from the OP and other answers. Also included a test larger than the 2-character case.

> library(rbenchmark)
> benchmark( replications=5, order="relative",
+   grep = sum(grepl("A|B",somechars)),
+   table = sum(table(somechars)[c("A","B")]),
+   c = sum(c(somechars=="A",somechars=="B")),
+   OR = sum(somechars=="A"|somechars=="B"),
+   IN = sum(somechars %in% c("A","B")),
+   plus = sum(somechars=="A")+sum(somechars=="B") )
   test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
6  plus            5   4.289 1.000000     3.836    0.436          0         0
3     c            5   4.991 1.163675     4.156    0.804          0         0
5    IN            5   5.480 1.277687     4.549    0.880          0         0
4    OR            5   5.574 1.299604     5.000    0.544          0         0
1  grep            5  16.426 3.829797    16.205    0.172          0         0
2 table            5  17.834 4.158079    12.793    4.884          0         0
> 
> benchmark( replications=5, order="relative",
+   grep = sum(grepl("A|B|C|D",somechars)),
+   table = sum(table(somechars)[c("A","B","C","D")]),
+   c = sum(c(somechars=="A",somechars=="B",
+             somechars=="C",somechars=="D")),
+   OR = sum(somechars=="A"|somechars=="B"|
+            somechars=="C"|somechars=="D"),
+   IN = sum(somechars %in% c("A","B","C","D")),
+   plus = sum(somechars=="A")+sum(somechars=="B")+
+          sum(somechars=="C")+sum(somechars=="D") )
   test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
5    IN            5   5.513 1.000000     4.464    1.004          0         0
6  plus            5   8.603 1.560493     7.705    0.860          0         0
3     c            5  10.283 1.865228     8.648    1.560          0         0
4    OR            5  12.348 2.239797    10.849    1.464          0         0
2 table            5  17.960 3.257754    12.877    4.921          0         0
1  grep            5  21.692 3.934700    21.405    0.192          0         0
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the concatenation of both vectors somechars=='A' and somechars=='B' is not necessary and slows down the computation. –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 12:40
4  
@TomasT. You will make more friends and influence more people on SO if you try and make your comments positive, rather than pointing out that answers have flaws. For example, you could have written "Nice answer - this will be even faster if you don't concatenate A and B" –  Andrie Oct 22 '11 at 15:05
    
Good point, Andrie, thanks. I just focused on the thing itself and that's possibly not the best approach... –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 15:10
    
This is all very useful, but ... it would be most interesting (to me) to compare the orders-of-magnitude differences between (1) regular-expression based solutions; (2) table as suggested by the OP; and (3) the various flavours being discussed here [because the time differences for a vector of length 1e7, while threefold between various solutions presented here, are still on the order of 1 second ...] –  Ben Bolker Oct 22 '11 at 15:56
    
Joshua, do you run your system.time multiple times? I don't get 'c' faster than '|' versions except in the noise (they are close). (2.13.2 64 bit, Mac OS X Lion) –  John Oct 22 '11 at 16:22

According to my expectations, sum(x=='A') + sum(x=='B') is the fastest.

Unlike the other solutions proposed here it doesn't have to do any other unnecessary operation like concatenating the intermediate results using c(..) or |. It does just the counting - the only thing which is really needed!

R 2.13.1:

> x <- sample(letters, 1e7, TRUE)
> system.time(sum(x=='A') + sum(x=='B'))
   user  system elapsed 
   1.75    0.16    1.98 
> system.time(sum(c(x=='A', x=='B')))
   user  system elapsed 
   2.40    0.23    4.27 
> system.time(sum(x=='A' | x=='B'))
   user  system elapsed 
   2.25    0.19    2.54 

But really interesting is comparison of sum(x %in% c('A','B')) with the first, fastest solution. In R 2.13.1 it takes the same time, in R 2.11.1, it is much slower (same result as John reported)! So I'd recommend to use the first solution: sum(x=='A')+sum(x=='B').

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Your recommend solution does not generalize as well (e.g. what if you want the count of 10 characters, instead of 2?). Not only that, but it's slower than %in% for more than 2 characters. And recommending your solution because it's faster in a 1-year old version of R is a bit of a reach. "I think we are sometimes optimizing too much - too much complication for no benefit." –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 22 '11 at 14:34
    
@JoshuaUlrich, I don't see the point of your comment - your solution sum(c(x=='A', x=='B')) doesn't generalize too, and furthermore is MUCH slower in all tested versions of R (37% slower in R 2.13.1). The only solution which generalizes is %in%, but its speed is still unpredictable and I don't now how this depends on R version, until I get response from John –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 14:45
    
I never claimed my solution was best; just that it was faster than regular expressions. You don't have to wait on John to see how it depends on R versions. Install several versions and test it yourself, if you're that concerned. –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 22 '11 at 14:49
    
Note that sampling letters gives you lower case letters, so testing for A or B will yield a vector of all FALSE values. The ordering of results may not change, but timings may be misleading. You should sample from LETTERS. –  Iterator Nov 1 '11 at 16:02

My favorite tool, tho' I didn't time-check it against Tomas' solutions, is

rle(sort(your_vector)) 

It's certainly the simplest solution :-) .

share|improve this answer
    
sort??? His concern is speed! –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 14:38
    
OP's original table(your_vector) does the same and is much shorter, easier and faster! –  TMS Oct 22 '11 at 14:50
    
Fair enough, Tomas. I stand down. –  Carl Witthoft Oct 22 '11 at 14:52
2  
@CarlWitthoft: How dare you offer a suggestion that isn't the best!!! ;-) –  Joshua Ulrich Oct 22 '11 at 14:58

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