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i am trying to determine what does this code?

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include<string.h>

using namespace std;

char *skip(char *p,int n)
{
    for (;n>0;p++)
        if (*p==0) n--;

    return p;      
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *p="dedamiwa";
    int n=4;
    cout<<skip(p,n)<<endl;
}

When I run it om dev c++,it wrotes

`basic_string::copy`

When i run it on ideone.com,it wrotes

prog.cpp: In function ‘int main(int, char**)’:
prog.cpp:15: warning: deprecated conversion from string constant to ‘char*’
prog.cpp:18: warning: ignoring return value of ‘int system(const char*)’, declared with attribute warn_unused_result
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It skips n characters of the char array.

It interpret the first parameter as a pointer to an array of character containing at least n null characters, and return a pointer after the n-th such null-character. Per se, there is no undefined behavior if you pass correct input to it.

Since you pass a simple null terminated string, it has undefined behavior, as there is only one such null-character in its input. It will access memory after the end of the string.

Concerning the compilation errors, in C++ a constant string is of type const char*, not char*, and you should check the return of the system function for error. by -- Sylvain Defresne

A version of the code with explicit braces is maybe a little bit more readable for you:

using namespace std;
char *skip(char *p,int n){
      for (;n>0;p++)
        if (*p==0) {
            n--;
        }
        return p;
}

To get rid of the error:

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    // cast the string which is of the type const char* to the
    // type of the defined variable(char*) will remove your warning.   
    char *p= (char*) "dedamiwa";
    int n=4;
    cout<<skip(p,n)<<endl;
}
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It searches for a certain number of \0 (n number of \0). It is undefined behaviour because it goes after the end of the string.

For the const part, string literals are const in c++. In c they aren't but still they mustn't be modified otherwise you get an undefined behavior (often a crash) (so even in c it's normally better to declare them as const and live happy)

The reason of the result of basic_string::copy is that in your (compiler/implementation specific, but quite common) compiled program there is an area where all the constant strings are saved "together". So if you go after the end of one, you go to the beginning of another. So someplace in your executable there is something like:

dedamiwa\0something\0somethingelse\0somethingelseelse\0basic_string::copy
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It interpret the first parameter as a pointer to an array of character containing at least n null characters, and return a pointer after the n-th such null-character. Per se, there is no undefined behavior if you pass correct input to it.

Since you pass a simple null terminated string, it has undefined behavior, as there is only one such null-character in its input. It will access memory after the end of the string.

Concerning the compilation errors, in C++ a constant string is of type const char*, not char*, and you should check the return of the system function for error.

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The skip procedure is asking for a segfault.

Basically, it increments p until the next '\0' is found, and repeats that n times.

In the best case, nothing will be printed because '\0...' is an empty string for std::cout(std::ostream&, const char *).

In the worst case, there be nasal dragons, to quote comp.lang.c.

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