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I have the following:

mod.a = (function() {
    var myPrivateVar = 'a';
    function myPrivateFct() {
        //do something I will need in my sub-module (mod.a.b)
    }
    return {
        //some public functions
    }
})();

mod.a.b = (function() {
    // some local vars and functions

    return {
          mySubModuleFct:function() {
              // here I want to call mod.a.myPrivateFct();
          }
})();

I want to create a sub-module and call a private function from my parent module mod.a. How can I do this while following the best practices of the module pattern?

Thanks, David

share|improve this question

A coworker showed me how to do it. It's actually very elegant.

mod.a = (function() {
    var myPrivateVar = 'a';
    function myPrivateFct() {
        //do something I will need in my sub-module (mod.a.b)
    }
    return {
        b: {
            bPublicMethod:function() {
                myPrivateFct(); // this will work!
            }
        }
        //some public functions
    }
})();

//call like this
mod.a.b.bPublicMethod(); // will call a.myPrivateFct();
share|improve this answer
1  
ah yeah good, also if you havent read this check it out yuiblog.com/blog/2007/06/12/module-pattern, explains what your coworker showed you – david Oct 27 '11 at 21:48

I would suggest using John Resig's Simple Inheritance code for more object-oriented approach to javascript:

http://ejohn.org/blog/simple-javascript-inheritance/

It allows you to write this:

var Person = Class.extend({
  init: function(isDancing){
    this.dancing = isDancing;
  }
});
var Ninja = Person.extend({
  init: function(){
    this._super( false );
  }
});

var p = new Person(true);
p.dancing; // => true

var n = new Ninja();
n.dancing; // => false 
share|improve this answer
    
That might work, but it is not really what I am looking for. I know that I could use inheritance the way you specified it, but I would need to re-write the current module that I have. I also want to follow the module pattern. Anyone? – David Ly-Gagnon Oct 24 '11 at 2:48

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