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in my function, i have this parameter:

map<string,int> *&itemList

I want to first check if a key exists. If this key exists obtain the value. I thought this:

map<string,int>::const_iterator it = itemList->find(buf.c_str());
if(it!=itemList->end())
    //how can I get the value corresponding to the key?

is the correct way to check whether the key exists?

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1  
Possible duplicate of : stackoverflow.com/questions/535317/… –  FailedDev Oct 22 '11 at 9:47
    
@FailedDev I disagree with the proposed duplicate - that question is asking about searching for values but this question is about searching for keys (and then using the corresponding value, but they're very different questions) –  Flexo Oct 23 '11 at 13:47

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Yes, this is correct way to do this. The value associated with the key is stored in second member of std::map iterator.

map<string,int>::const_iterator it = itemList->find(buf.c_str());
if(it!=itemList->end())
{
  return it->second; // do something with value corresponding to the key
}
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No need to iterate through all the items, you can just access the one with the specified key.

if ( itemList->find(key) != itemList->end() )
{
   //key is present
   return *itemList[key];  //return value
}
else
{
   //key not present
}

EDIT:

The previous version looks up the map twice. A better solution would be:

map::iterator<T> it = itemList->find(key);
if ( it != itemList->end() )
{
   //key is present
   return *it;  //return value
}
else
{
   //key not present
}
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1  
No need to look up the item twice, either. find() returns an iterator to access it directly. –  Mike Seymour Oct 22 '11 at 10:24
1  
Don't do that. You are now searching the tree twice. The value is available in find(key)->second (assuming it is not end). –  Loki Astari Oct 22 '11 at 10:25
    
I knew that, it was just for readability and to show the usage of the [] operator. Will edit my answer. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 10:43
1  
@LuchianGrigore Still wrong (or unappropriate), as *it returns a key-value pair. The actual value can be retrieved more easily using it->second directly. Have you even looked at the 5 points better answer or at least the comments to yours? –  Christian Rau Oct 22 '11 at 16:48

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