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I'm trying to store in a std::tuple a varying number of values, which will later be used as arguments for a call to a function pointer which matches the stored types.

I've created a simplified example showing the problem I'm struggling to solve:

#include <iostream>
#include <tuple>

void f(int a, double b, void* c) {
  std::cout << a << ":" << b << ":" << c << std::endl;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later {
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  void delayed_dispatch() {
     // How can I "unpack" params to call func?
     func(std::get<0>(params), std::get<1>(params), std::get<2>(params));
     // But I *really* don't want to write 20 versions of dispatch so I'd rather 
     // write something like:
     func(params...); // Not legal
  }
};

int main() {
  int a=666;
  double b = -1.234;
  void *c = NULL;

  save_it_for_later<int,double,void*> saved = {
                                 std::tuple<int,double,void*>(a,b,c), f};
  saved.delayed_dispatch();
}

Normally for problems involving std::tuple or variadic templates I'd write another template like template <typename Head, typename ...Tail> to recursively evaluate all of the types one by one, but I can't see a way of doing that for dispatching a function call.

The real motivation for this is somewhat more complex and it's mostly just a learning exercise anyway.

What's a clean way of dispatching the call using the std::tuple, or an alternative better way of achieving the same net result of storing/forwarding some values and a function pointer until an arbitrary future point?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 132 down vote accepted

You need to build a parameter pack of numbers and unpack them

template<int ...>
struct seq { };

template<int N, int ...S>
struct gens : gens<N-1, N-1, S...> { };

template<int ...S>
struct gens<0, S...> {
  typedef seq<S...> type;
};


// ...
  void delayed_dispatch() {
     callFunc(typename gens<sizeof...(Args)>::type());
  }

  template<int ...S>
  void callFunc(seq<S...>) {
     func(std::get<S>(params) ...);
  }
// ...
share|improve this answer
    
That's a really neat trick which I suspect I'll find useful for more than just this problem! –  Flexo Oct 22 '11 at 11:10
3  
Wow, I did not know the unpacking operator could be used like that, this is nice! –  Luc Touraille Oct 22 '11 at 13:09
13  
+1 assuming that it works... (oops, I unpacked the "works") –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Feb 13 '12 at 3:04
3  
Johannes, I realize its been 2+ years since you posted this, but the one thing I'm struggling with is the struct gens generic definition (the one that inherits from an expanded derivation of said same). I see it eventually hits the specialization with 0. If the mood suits you and you have the spare cycles, if you can expand on that, and how it is utilized for this, I would be eternally grateful. And I wish I could up-vote this a hundred times. I've had more fun playing with tangents from this code. Thanks. –  WhozCraig Nov 18 '13 at 9:38
2  
@WhozCraig: What it does is generate a type seq<0, 1, .., N-1>. How it works: gens<5>: gens<4, 4>: gens<3, 3, 4>: gens<2, 2, 3, 4> : gens<1, 1, 2, 3, 4> : gens<0, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4>. The last type is specialized, creating seq<0, 1, 2, 3, 4>. Pretty clever trick. –  mindvirus Apr 25 at 15:38

This is a complete compilable version of Johanne's solution to awoodland's question, in the hope it may be useful to somebody. This was tested with a snapshot of g++ 4.7 on Debian squeeze.

###################
johannes.cc
###################
#include <tuple>
#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

template<int ...> struct seq {};

template<int N, int ...S> struct gens : gens<N-1, N-1, S...> {};

template<int ...S> struct gens<0, S...>{ typedef seq<S...> type; };

double foo(int x, float y, double z)
{
  return x + y + z;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  double (*func)(Args...);

  double delayed_dispatch()
  {
    return callFunc(typename gens<sizeof...(Args)>::type());
  }

  template<int ...S>
  double callFunc(seq<S...>)
  {
    return func(std::get<S>(params) ...);
  }
};

#pragma GCC diagnostic push
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-parameter"
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-variable"
#pragma GCC diagnostic ignored "-Wunused-but-set-variable"
int main(void)
{
  gens<10> g;
  gens<10>::type s;
  std::tuple<int, float, double> t = std::make_tuple(1, 1.2, 5);
  save_it_for_later<int,float, double> saved = {t, foo};
  cout << saved.delayed_dispatch() << endl;
}
#pragma GCC diagnostic pop

One can use the following SConstruct file

#####################
SConstruct
#####################
#!/usr/bin/python

env = Environment(CXX="g++-4.7", CXXFLAGS="-Wall -Werror -g -O3 -std=c++11")
env.Program(target="johannes", source=["johannes.cc"])

On my machine, this gives

g++-4.7 -o johannes.o -c -Wall -Werror -g -O3 -std=c++11 johannes.cc
g++-4.7 -o johannes johannes.o
share|improve this answer

Here is a C++14 solution.

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  template<std::size_t ...I>
  void call_func(std::index_sequence<I...>)
  { func(std::get<I>(params)...); }
  void delayed_dispatch()
  { call_func(std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}); }
};

This still needs one helper function (call_func). Since this is a common idiom, perhaps the standard should support it directly as std::call with possible implementation

// helper class
template<typename R, template<typename...> class Params, typename... Args, std::size_t... I>
R call_helper(std::function<R(Args...)> const&func, Params<Args...> const&params, std::index_sequence<I...>)
{ return func(std::get<I>(params)...); }

// "return func(params...)"
template<typename R, template<typename...> class Params, typename... Args>
R call(std::function<R(Args...)> const&func, Params<Args...> const&params)
{ return call_helper(func,params,std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}); }

Then our delayed dispatch becomes

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later
{
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  std::function<void(Args...)> func;
  void delayed_dispatch()
  { std::call(func,params); }
};
share|improve this answer
3  
Upvoted for the (proposed) implementation of std::call. C++14's chaotic zoo of integer_sequence and index_sequence helper types is explained here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/integer_sequence Notice the conspicuous absence of std::make_index_sequence(Args...), which is why Walter was forced into the clunkier syntax std::index_sequence_for<Args...>{}. –  Quuxplusone Jan 26 at 21:02

This is a bit complicated to achieve (even though it is possible). I advise you to use a library where this is already implemented, namely Boost.Fusion (the invoke function). As a bonus, Boost Fusion works with C++03 compilers as well.

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Thinking about the problem some more based on the answer given I've found another way of solving the same problem:

template <int N, int M, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse;

template <typename ...Types>
struct dispatcher {
  template <typename F, typename ...Args>
  static void impl(F f, const std::tuple<Types...>& params, Args... args) {
     call_or_recurse<sizeof...(Args), sizeof...(Types), dispatcher<Types...> >::call(f, params, args...);
  }
};

template <int N, int M, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse {
  // recurse again
  template <typename F, typename T, typename ...Args>
  static void call(F f, const T& t, Args... args) {
     D::template impl(f, t, std::get<M-(N+1)>(t), args...);
  }
};

template <int N, typename D>
struct call_or_recurse<N,N,D> {
  // do the call
  template <typename F, typename T, typename ...Args>
  static void call(F f, const T&, Args... args) {
     f(args...);
  }
};

Which requires changing the implementation of delayed_dispatch() to:

  void delayed_dispatch() {
     dispatcher<Args...>::impl(func, params);
  }

This works by recursively converting the std::tuple into a parameter pack in its own right. call_or_recurse is needed as a specialization to terminate the recursion with the real call, which just unpacks the completed parameter pack.

I'm not sure this is in anyway a "better" solution, but it's another way of thinking about and solving it.


As another alternative solution you can use enable_if, to form something arguably simpler than my previous solution:

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>
#include <tuple>

void f(int a, double b, void* c) {
  std::cout << a << ":" << b << ":" << c << std::endl;
}

template <typename ...Args>
struct save_it_for_later {
  std::tuple<Args...> params;
  void (*func)(Args...);

  template <typename ...Actual>
  typename std::enable_if<sizeof...(Actual) != sizeof...(Args)>::type
  delayed_dispatch(Actual&& ...a) {
    delayed_dispatch(std::forward<Actual>(a)..., std::get<sizeof...(Actual)>(params));
  }

  void delayed_dispatch(Args ...args) {
    func(args...);
  }
};

int main() {
  int a=666;
  double b = -1.234;
  void *c = NULL;

  save_it_for_later<int,double,void*> saved = {
                                 std::tuple<int,double,void*>(a,b,c), f};
  saved.delayed_dispatch();
}

The first overload just takes one more argument from the tuple and puts it into a parameter pack. The second overload takes a matching parameter pack and then makes the real call, with the first overload being disabled in the one and only case where the second would be viable.

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1  
I worked on something awfully similar to this a while back. If I have time I'll go have a second look and see how it compares to the current answers. –  Michael Price Oct 22 '11 at 18:45
    
@MichaelPrice - purely from the learning perspective I'd be interested in seeing any alternative solutions that don't boil down to some awful hack botching the stack pointer (or similarly calling convention specific tricks). –  Flexo Oct 22 '11 at 19:45

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