Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have just been studying the concept of recursion and I thought that I would try a simple example. In the following code, I am attempting to take the numbers: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, and add them together using recursion. I expected the result to be 15, but my code is returning 16.

What am I doing wrong?

Code:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        Console.WriteLine(Sum(5));
        Console.Read();
    }


    static int Sum(int value)
    {
        if (value > 0)
        {
          return value + Sum(value - 1);
        }
        else
        {
            return 1;
        }
    }
share|improve this question

11 Answers 11

You're returning 1 in the else clause. You should be returning 0:

else
{
    return 0;
}

If the value is not greater than zero, why would you return one in the first place?

share|improve this answer
    
why would this get all the up votes? the other are correct and were entered before this one? –  KM. Apr 24 '09 at 13:50
4  
It was first, and it's right, and it's up to people to decide why they vote. –  Welbog Apr 24 '09 at 13:51
3  
Apparently you have trouble telling time. –  TheTXI Apr 24 '09 at 13:51
    
duh? I am an idiot, I must have read the times wrong –  KM. Apr 24 '09 at 14:08
    
@Welbog: +20 (and counting) for 30 seconds work. Nice one. :-) –  Tomalak Apr 24 '09 at 14:17

Your code executes as follows:

Sum --> 5
  Sum --> 4
    Sum --> 3
      Sum --> 2
        Sum --> 1
          Sum --> 0
          1 <---
        2 <---
      4 <---
    7 <---
  11 <---
16 <---

Check your base case.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for "base case" –  Rob Apr 24 '09 at 13:59

Others already noted the error, and I will elaborate on recursion.

Although C# does not currently perform tail call optimization (although IL has special tail instruction), it's worth mentioning that tail recursion is generally a good thing.

Tail recursion is a special case of recursion in which the last operation of the function, the tail call, is a recursive call. Since the last call is the recursive call there is no need to preserve stack frame of the calling function and the compiler can easily use this information to generate machine instruction such that the stack doesn't grow at all. So it can basically turn recursive function into an iterative one.

Rewriting your code to support tail recursion can be done as follws:

static int Sum(int result, int value)
{
    if(value == 0)
        return result;

    Sum(result + value, value - 1);
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Don't forget the return at the end. –  Seth Carnegie Apr 28 '11 at 6:37

That's because, when the value is = 0, you return 1. Then it get's added.

Sum's "else" clause should return 0.

share|improve this answer
static int Sum(int value)
{
    if (value > 0)
    {
        return value + Sum(value - 1);
    }
    else
    {
        return 0; //Change this.
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
And, when you pass in zero, what happens? –  paxdiablo Apr 24 '09 at 13:53
    
Good thing we're generating a sum and not a factorial. –  Welbog Apr 24 '09 at 14:04
    
Oops! Forgot. Deleted the comment and updated the answer :sheepish grin: –  Kirtan Apr 24 '09 at 14:24

I always prefer to put the terminating case(s) up front so they're obvious, and I have a violent near-psychopathic hatred of "if cond then return a else return b" constructs. My choice would be (making it clear that it won't work properly for negative numbers):

static unsigned int Sum(unsigned int value) {
    if (value == 0)
        return 0;
    return value + Sum(value - 1);
}

I believe that's far more readable than a morass of braces and control flow.

share|improve this answer

The others have already answered that question, but when I work with recursion, one of the things I like to do to check that it works is to use check the base case and one additional case. I your case I would test it with 1, which would yield 2. Since this is obviously wrong you might want to check for 0 which is not going to use any recursion and so it should be obvious that the error lies in the base class.

In general recursion is easier to reason about, since you can list the limited number of things you need to check, but it does initially require a leap of faith since your intuition will be wrong. Just test the edge cases and trust the math it will never fail.

share|improve this answer

I'm pretty sure the problem is because you want your recursion to terminate when value == 1, and it's currently terminating when value == 0.

share|improve this answer

Your terminating expression is at issue. When value == 0 (or lower), it should return a 0 rather than 1. For sake of efficiency (which, let's admit it here, obviously isn't a concern, otherwise recursion wouldn't have been used for this task), you should terminate the recursion at value == 1 and return a literal 1 to save one unnecessary level of recursion.

share|improve this answer
int summation(int num){

    if (num==1)
        return 1;

    return summation(num-1)+num;
}
share|improve this answer
using System;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace Recursion
{
  [TestFixture()]
    public class Test
    {
        [Test()]
        public void TestSum ()
        {
            Assert.AreEqual (Sum (new int[] { }), 0);
            Assert.AreEqual (Sum (new int[] { 0 }), 0);
            Assert.AreEqual (Sum (new int[] { 1 }), 1);
            Assert.AreEqual (Sum (new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 }), 15);
        }

        public int Sum(int[] head)
        {
            if (head.Length == 0) return 0;

            int[] tail = new int[head.Length - 1];

            for (int i = 1; i < head.Length; i++) 
            {
                tail [i-1] = head [i];
            }

            return head[0] + Sum (tail);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.