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I have more than twenty divs. The divs have id's of #div_1,#div_2,#div_3...

Each div has a button and an image. and they are named the same in each div: #button_1, #image_1.

Is it possible to construct my css like this:

#div1 {
  #button_1{ };

  #image_1{};  
}


#div2 { 
  #button_1{};

  #image_1{};  
}
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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First things first, you should never use the same ID more than once in a single page. The whole point of an ID is that it is unique.

Therefore, having a button called id='button_1' inside each of your divs is wrong.

If you want to use the same reference multiple times, use a class instead of ID. So your buttons, for example, should be class='button_1' instead.

Secondly, the CSS syntax you're asking for is not correct. You can't nest CSS in this way. However, what you're asking for can be achieved quite easily; simply chain the selectors together like so:

#div1 .button_1 { ... }
#div1 .image_1 { ... }

#div2 .button_1 { ... }
#div2 .image_1 { ... }

etc.

However, if the images and buttons are similar between, you don't need to specify the styles twice, just create a CSS block for the two classes that contain the shared styles:

.button_1 { ... }
.image_1 { ... }

Any styles that are different between them you can still declare in the same way as discussed before, so your whole CSS could look like this:

/* shared styles for all the buttons */
.button_1 { ... }
/* shared styles for all the images */
.image_1 { ... }

/* extra styles only applying to the ones in div1 */
#div1 .button_1 { ... }
#div1 .image_1 { ... }

/* extra styles only applying to the ones in div2 */
#div2 .button_1 { ... }
#div2 .image_1 { ... }

...etc.

Hope that helps.

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Thanks, yeah the button, image properties are unique. I will use classes like #div1 .button_1 But I was also hoping I can put them in same brackets of div1 css. Just a little easier to read –  stone Oct 22 '11 at 13:06
1  
@stone - CSS doesn't allow nesting in that way, but there are a couple of extended-CSS languages called SASS and Less, both of which do allow it. However they aren't standard CSS, and have to be converted back to standard CSS before going on your site, so it's best to be sure you're completely comfortable with standard CSS before moving onto them. –  Spudley Oct 22 '11 at 17:03

IDs are unique, you should not repeat them in a page. You can't have multiple #button_1's and #image_1's

What you really should be doing is:

HTML

<div id="div-1" class="foo">
    <button id="button-1">Hello</button>
    <img src="blah.gif" id="img-1" />
</div>


<div id="div-2" class="foo">
    <button id="button-2">Hello</button>
    <img src="blah.gif" id="img-2" />
</div>


<div id="div-3" class="foo">
    <button id="button-3">Hello</button>
    <img src="blah.gif" id="img-3" />
</div>

CSS

.foo { ... }
  .foo button { ... }
  .foo img { ... }

Note that to style the buttons and images inside the divs you don't actually need to give them IDs

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No, you can't write your CSS like that. In any case, if you find yourself styling 20 individual DIVs in a series then you're doing something wrong. It would be simpler for you to write styles for the classes rather than writing them for IDs

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What you can do is write something like :

#div2 #button_1{

}

#div2 #image_1{

}

if you are trying to make the CSS rules only available to the objects inside a certain div (in the example above they only apply to divs inside div2.

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Take a look at http://sass-lang.com/ you want to use a mixin

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1  
He's not asking about mixins; he just doesn't know the basic CSS syntax yet. –  Spudley Oct 22 '11 at 12:25

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