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this is not related to any problem in particular but just me thinking.Does the presence of lots of IF statements in code signify bad code design and reduce efficiency or not.

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3 Answers 3

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Theoretically, lots of 'if' statements would not significantly reduce code efficiency. The code simply determines the boolean value of the expression and decides whether or not to continue. If there are many 'if' statements within an iterative loop, however, that could cause a larger problem in terms of efficiency.

Bad design is a whole other issue that I'm not going to mention (Ziminji has covered it better than I could).

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If you really want to optimize the code, be aware of this:

if (complexCalculation(someVariable) > 10)
{
}
else if (complexCalculation(someVariable) > 5)
{
}

the point is, if you are trying to optimize some code, try to "cache" the result of calculations in variables, instead of redoing many times the same calculation

int cached = complexCalculation(someVariable);

if (cached > 10)
{
}
else if (cached > 5)
{
}

Why this? Now... If complexCalculation is deterministic based on its parameters (so complexCalculation(N) == complexCalculation(N) always, in simple words, you call it twice with the same parameters and you will receive both times the same result always) and is without side-effects (so it doesn't modify anything else), then the compiler could optimize it freely. The problem is that quite often the compiler isn't able to verify if a function is deterministic and without side-effects, and very very few languages (primarily the functional languages like F#, Haskell...) make it easy to tell it to the compiler (technically in the functiona languages all the functions should be deterministic and without side effects :-) ).

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In general, the presence of a lot of "if" statement is considered bad design. Consider replacing conditionals with polymorphism. This one of the topics in Martin Fowler's book "Refactoring: Improving the Design of Existing Code" on page 255. Checkout the following article if you don't have the book: http://sourcemaking.com/refactoring/replace-conditional-with-polymorphism

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-1 this only applies to OOP, not to programming in general. OP didn't mention any particular language or paradigm. –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 22 '11 at 14:00
    
While my critic is right that my answer applies to OOP, my answer is not wrong with regards to the bad design part of the question. Just as an FYI to my critic, it can still be bad design in other programming paradigms. BTW down voting should be reserved to answers that are unproductive and are irrelevant, which mine is not. –  Ziminji Oct 22 '11 at 14:35
    
the key word here is "can". Almost anything can be considered bad design in particular situations. Fowler does describe one such particular situation. But plainly generalizing In general, the presence of a lot of "if" statement is considered bad design is incorrect. Therefore, -1. –  Mauricio Scheffer Oct 22 '11 at 18:02

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