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I have this:

#include<stdio.h>

void main()
{
   printf("Hello");
}

The output will be Hello. But I want the output to be displayed as "Hello". How can I do this?

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Just escape with the backslash the double quotes literal:

 printf("\"Hello\"");
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By using its ascii code! (just kidding... Escape it :-) )

It's code 34, so 22 in hexadecimal or 42 in octal. Is it enough?

printf("\x22Hello\x22");
printf("\n");
printf("\042Hello\042");

Now we will go for the over-overkill:

printf("%cHello%c", '"', '"');

We let the printf "compose" our string and we pass it two chars as parameters. The two chars are the ", but the quote used for char is single-quote, so no problems :-)

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seriously? :D why not use single quote twice? – ArtoAle Oct 22 '11 at 13:04
1  
wow, the over-overkill solution rocks! – ArtoAle Oct 22 '11 at 13:11

Enclose it in backslash-escaped quotes:

 printf("\"Hello\"");
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Just write:

printf("\"Hello\"");
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printf("\"%s\"", "hello");

or

#define prints(x) printf("\"%s\"", (x))
prints("hello");
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