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I am creating an application which connects to the server using username/password and I would like to enable the option "Save password" so the user wouldn't have to type the password each time the application starts.

I was trying to do it with Shared Preferences but am not sure if this is the best solution.

I would appreciate any suggestion on how to store user values/settings in Android application.

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13 Answers 13

up vote 154 down vote accepted

In general SharedPreferences are your best bet for storing preferences, so in general I'd recommend that approach for saving application and user settings.

The only area of concern here is what you're saving. Passwords are always a tricky thing to store, and I'd be particularly wary of storing them as clear text. The Android architecture is such that your application's SharedPreferences are sandboxed to prevent other applications from being able to access the values so there's some security there, but physical access to a phone could potentially allow access to the values.

If possible I'd consider modifying the server to use a negotiated token for providing access, something like OAuth. Alternatively you may need to construct some sort of cryptographic store, though that's non-trivial. At the very least, make sure you're encrypting the password before writing it to disk.

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1  
Could you please explain what you mean by sandboxed? –  Abhijit Jul 3 '12 at 15:00
9  
a sandboxed program is any application whose process and information (such as those shared preferences) remains hidden from the rest of the applications. An android application running in a package cannot directly access to anything inside another package. That's why applications in the same package (which are always yours) could access to information from other ones –  Korcholis Jul 12 '12 at 20:46
29  
if anyone has any doubts, pay attention: this is THE reto meier (currently Tech Lead on the Android Developer Relations team). if he says something, you'd better listen. he wrote the friggin book! –  tony gil Jul 22 '12 at 14:25
    
@Reto Meier my requirement is to protect the publicly available web services for that I am using a token, is storing it on shared preferences is safe? i have a bootup broadcast receiver in my application which will delete all sharedpreferences data if it found device as rooted. Is this enough to protect my token. –  pyus13 Mar 11 '13 at 19:47
1  
Per android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/02/…, User credentials should be stored with the MODE_PRIVATE flag set and stored in internal storage (with the same caveats about storing any sort of password locally ultimately open to attack). That said, is using MODE_PRIVATE with SharedPreferences equivalent to doing the same with a file created on internal storage, in terms of effectiveness to obfuscate locally stored data? –  qix Oct 18 '13 at 20:06

I agree with Reto and fiXedd. Objectively speaking it doesn't make a lot of sense investing significant time and effort into encrypting passwords in SharedPreferences since any attacker that has access to your preferences file is fairly likely to also have access to your application's binary, and therefore the keys to unencrypt the password.

However, that being said, there does seem to be a publicity initiative going on identifying mobile applications that store their passwords in cleartext in SharedPreferences and shining unfavorable light on those applications. See http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2011/06/08/some-top-apps-put-data-at-risk/ and http://viaforensics.com/appwatchdog for some examples.

While we need more attention paid to security in general, I would argue that this sort of attention on this one particular issue doesn't actually significantly increase our overall security. However, perceptions being as they are, here's a solution to encrypt the data you place in SharedPreferences.

Simply wrap your own SharedPreferences object in this one, and any data you read/write will be automatically encrypted and decrypted. eg.

final SharedPreferences prefs = new ObscuredSharedPreferences( 
    this, this.getSharedPreferences(MY_PREFS_FILE_NAME, Context.MODE_PRIVATE) );

// eg.    
prefs.edit().putString("foo","bar").commit();
prefs.getString("foo", null);

Here's the code for the class:

/**
 * Warning, this gives a false sense of security.  If an attacker has enough access to
 * acquire your password store, then he almost certainly has enough access to acquire your
 * source binary and figure out your encryption key.  However, it will prevent casual
 * investigators from acquiring passwords, and thereby may prevent undesired negative
 * publicity.
 */
public class ObscuredSharedPreferences implements SharedPreferences {
    protected static final String UTF8 = "utf-8";
    private static final char[] SEKRIT = ... ; // INSERT A RANDOM PASSWORD HERE.
                                               // Don't use anything you wouldn't want to
                                               // get out there if someone decompiled
                                               // your app.


    protected SharedPreferences delegate;
    protected Context context;

    public ObscuredSharedPreferences(Context context, SharedPreferences delegate) {
        this.delegate = delegate;
        this.context = context;
    }

    public class Editor implements SharedPreferences.Editor {
        protected SharedPreferences.Editor delegate;

        public Editor() {
            this.delegate = ObscuredSharedPreferences.this.delegate.edit();                    
        }

        @Override
        public Editor putBoolean(String key, boolean value) {
            delegate.putString(key, encrypt(Boolean.toString(value)));
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public Editor putFloat(String key, float value) {
            delegate.putString(key, encrypt(Float.toString(value)));
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public Editor putInt(String key, int value) {
            delegate.putString(key, encrypt(Integer.toString(value)));
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public Editor putLong(String key, long value) {
            delegate.putString(key, encrypt(Long.toString(value)));
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public Editor putString(String key, String value) {
            delegate.putString(key, encrypt(value));
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public void apply() {
            delegate.apply();
        }

        @Override
        public Editor clear() {
            delegate.clear();
            return this;
        }

        @Override
        public boolean commit() {
            return delegate.commit();
        }

        @Override
        public Editor remove(String s) {
            delegate.remove(s);
            return this;
        }
    }

    public Editor edit() {
        return new Editor();
    }


    @Override
    public Map<String, ?> getAll() {
        throw new UnsupportedOperationException(); // left as an exercise to the reader
    }

    @Override
    public boolean getBoolean(String key, boolean defValue) {
        final String v = delegate.getString(key, null);
        return v!=null ? Boolean.parseBoolean(decrypt(v)) : defValue;
    }

    @Override
    public float getFloat(String key, float defValue) {
        final String v = delegate.getString(key, null);
        return v!=null ? Float.parseFloat(decrypt(v)) : defValue;
    }

    @Override
    public int getInt(String key, int defValue) {
        final String v = delegate.getString(key, null);
        return v!=null ? Integer.parseInt(decrypt(v)) : defValue;
    }

    @Override
    public long getLong(String key, long defValue) {
        final String v = delegate.getString(key, null);
        return v!=null ? Long.parseLong(decrypt(v)) : defValue;
    }

    @Override
    public String getString(String key, String defValue) {
        final String v = delegate.getString(key, null);
        return v != null ? decrypt(v) : defValue;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean contains(String s) {
        return delegate.contains(s);
    }

    @Override
    public void registerOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(OnSharedPreferenceChangeListener onSharedPreferenceChangeListener) {
        delegate.registerOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(onSharedPreferenceChangeListener);
    }

    @Override
    public void unregisterOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(OnSharedPreferenceChangeListener onSharedPreferenceChangeListener) {
        delegate.unregisterOnSharedPreferenceChangeListener(onSharedPreferenceChangeListener);
    }




    protected String encrypt( String value ) {

        try {
            final byte[] bytes = value!=null ? value.getBytes(UTF8) : new byte[0];
            SecretKeyFactory keyFactory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
            SecretKey key = keyFactory.generateSecret(new PBEKeySpec(SEKRIT));
            Cipher pbeCipher = Cipher.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
            pbeCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, key, new PBEParameterSpec(Settings.Secure.getString(context.getContentResolver(),Settings.System.ANDROID_ID).getBytes(UTF8), 20));
            return new String(Base64.encode(pbeCipher.doFinal(bytes), Base64.NO_WRAP),UTF8);

        } catch( Exception e ) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }

    }

    protected String decrypt(String value){
        try {
            final byte[] bytes = value!=null ? Base64.decode(value,Base64.DEFAULT) : new byte[0];
            SecretKeyFactory keyFactory = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
            SecretKey key = keyFactory.generateSecret(new PBEKeySpec(SEKRIT));
            Cipher pbeCipher = Cipher.getInstance("PBEWithMD5AndDES");
            pbeCipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, key, new PBEParameterSpec(Settings.Secure.getString(context.getContentResolver(),Settings.System.ANDROID_ID).getBytes(UTF8), 20));
            return new String(pbeCipher.doFinal(bytes),UTF8);

        } catch( Exception e) {
            throw new RuntimeException(e);
        }
    }

}
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3  
FYI Base64 is available in API level 8 (2.2) and later. You can use iharder.sourceforge.net/current/java/base64 or something else for earlier OSs. –  emmby Jun 20 '11 at 22:19
1  
Or generate your own ID: android-developers.blogspot.com/2011/03/… –  Matt Briançon Jan 7 '12 at 23:26
11  
Yes, I wrote this. Feel free to use, no attribution necessary –  emmby Sep 10 '12 at 16:21
3  
I agree with you. But if the password is only used on the server, why not use Public/private key encryption? Public key on client when saving the password. The client will never have to read the clear text password again, right? The server can then decrypt it with the private key. So even if somebody goes through your app source code, they can't get the password, except they hack your server and get the private key. –  Patrick Boos Sep 24 '12 at 1:43
2  
You should use now Settings.Secure.ANDROID_ID, according to this: developer.android.com/reference/android/provider/… –  dwbrito Jun 18 '13 at 10:54

About the simplest way to store a single preference in an Android Activity is to do something like this:

Editor e = this.getPreferences(Context.MODE_PRIVATE).edit();
e.putString("password", mPassword);
e.commit();

If you're worried about the security of these then you could always encrypt the password before storing it.

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8  
I couldn't agree with you more about this simplistic approach; however, you should always be worried about the security of passwords that you store? Depending on your application, you have potential liabilities for stolen personal information. Just pointing this out for anybody trying to store actual passwords to such things as bank accounts or something equally important. I still vote you though. –  While-E Jun 16 '11 at 4:21
    
Agreed, amended. –  fiXedd Jun 18 at 17:26
    
Where would you store the key that stored the password? If the shared preferences are accessible by other users, so is the key. –  OrhanC1 Aug 7 at 14:08

If you want to store passwords in a SharedPreference, you should encrypt it first, just to be safe. The code on this page may be used:

http://www.androidsnippets.com/encryptdecrypt-strings

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Link to androidsnippets is 404. –  javawebapps Jun 20 '12 at 20:30
    
@javawebapps, I just tried and I did not get a 404-- page loads fine. Maybe you hit it at a bad time? –  Richard Jun 30 '12 at 20:47
    
The link is working now. –  javawebapps Jul 3 '12 at 1:28
    
Just note that there are several comments on that article saying it is a poor way of doing encryption on Android. –  RenniePet Sep 6 '13 at 2:48
    
android-developers.blogspot.com/2013/02/… Rather than doing your own custom obfuscation: The fact is, Android's existing security model already provides plenty of protection for this kind of data. User credentials should be stored with the MODE_PRIVATE flag set and stored in internal storage, rather than on an SD card, since permissions aren't enforced on external storage. –  qix Oct 18 '13 at 19:58

Using the snippet provided by Richard, you can encrypt the password before saving it. The preferences API however doesn't provide an easy way to intercept the value and encrypt it - you can block it being saved via an OnPreferenceChange listener, and you theoretically could modify it through a preferenceChangeListener, but that results in an endless loop.

I had earlier suggested adding a "hidden" preference in order to accomplish this. It's definitely not the best way. I'm going to present two other options that I consider to be more viable.

First, the simplest, is in a preferenceChangeListener, you can grab the entered value, encrypt it, and then save it to an alternative preferences file:

  public boolean onPreferenceChange(Preference preference, Object newValue) {
      // get our "secure" shared preferences file.
      SharedPreferences secure = context.getSharedPreferences(
         "SECURE",
         Context.MODE_PRIVATE
      );
      String encryptedText = null;
      // encrypt and set the preference.
      try {
         encryptedText = SimpleCrypto.encrypt(Preferences.SEED,(String)newValue);

         Editor editor = secure.getEditor();
         editor.putString("encryptedPassword",encryptedText);
         editor.commit();
      }
      catch (Exception e) {
         e.printStackTrace();
      }
      // always return false.
      return false; 
   }

The second way, and the way I now prefer, is to create your own custom preference, extending EditTextPreference, @Override'ing the setText() and getText() methods, so that setText() encrypts the password, and getText() returns null.

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I know this is pretty old, but would you mind posting your code for your custom version of EditTextPreference, please? –  RenniePet Sep 6 '13 at 2:50
    
Never mind, I found a usable sample here groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/android-developers/pMYNEVXMa6M and I've got it working now. Thanks for suggesting this approach. –  RenniePet Sep 6 '13 at 5:04

I know this is a little bit of necromancy, but you should use the Android AccountManager. It's purpose-built for this scenario. It's a little bit cumbersome but one of the things it does is invalidate the local credentials if the SIM card changes, so if somebody swipes your phone and throws a new SIM in it, your credentials won't be compromised.

This also gives the user a quick and easy way to access (and potentially delete) the stored credentials for any account they have on the device, all from one place.

SampleSyncAdapter is an example that makes use of stored account credentials.

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1  
Please note that using the AccountManager is not more secure than any other method provided above! developer.android.com/training/id-auth/… –  Sander Versluys Nov 8 '12 at 10:14
    
The use case for AccountManager is when the account has to be shared between different apps, and apps from different authors. Storing the password and giving it to any requesting app would not be appropriate. If the usage of the user/password is only for a single app, don't use AccountManager. –  dolmen Nov 12 '12 at 0:34
1  
@dolmen, that's not quite correct. The AccountManager won't give the account password to any app whose UID doesn't match the Authenticator's. The name, yes; the auth token, yes; the password, no. If you try, it'll throw a SecurityException. And the use case is much broader than that. developer.android.com/training/id-auth/identify.html –  Jon O Nov 12 '12 at 15:37

Okay; it's been a while since the answer is kind-of mixed, but here's a few common answers. I researched this like crazy and it was hard to build a good answer

  1. The MODE_PRIVATE method is considered generally safe, if you assume that the user didn't root the device. Your data is stored in plain text in a part of the file system that can only be accessed by the original program. This makings grabbing the password with another app on a rooted device easy. Then again, do you want to support rooted devices?

  2. AES is still the best encryption you can do. Remember to look this up if you are starting a new implementation if it's been a while since I posted this. The largest issue with this is "What to do with the encryption key?"

So, now we are at the "What to do with the key?" portion. This is the hard part. Getting the key turns out to be not that bad. You can use a key derivation function to take some password and make it a pretty secure key. You do get into issues like "how many passes do you do with PKFDF2?", but that's another topic

  1. Ideally, you store the AES key off the device. You have to figure out a good way to retrieve the key from the server safely, reliably, and securely though

  2. You have a login sequence of some sort (even the original login sequence you do for remote access). You can do two runs of your key generator on the same password. How this works is that you derive the key twice with a new salt and a new secure initialization vector. You store one of those generated passwords on the device, and you use the second password as the AES key.

When you log in, you re-derive the key on the local login and compare it to the stored key. Once that is done, you use derive key #2 for AES.

  1. Using the "generally safe" approach, you encrypt the data using AES and store the key in MODE_PRIVATE. This is recommended by a recent-ish Android blog post. Not incredibly secure, but way better for some people over plain text

You can do a lot of variations of these. For example, instead of a full login sequence, you can do a quick PIN (derived). The quick PIN might not be as secure as a full login sequence, but it's many times more secure than plain text

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In my current code I've just used a CheckBoxPreference as part of a PreferenceScreen object/resource.

It seems to work fine, and given a PreferenceScreen object the system can build its own UI for lists of preferences really easily.

This method does require that you create a new Activity which extends PreferenceActivity, but it's pretty trivial.

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This answer is based on a suggested approach by Mark. A custom version of the EditTextPreference class is created which converts back and forth between the plain text seen in the view and an encrypted version of the password stored in the preferences storage.

As has been pointed out by most who have answered on this thread, this is not a very secure technique, although the degree of security depends partly on the encryption/decryption code used. But it's fairly simple and convenient, and will thwart most casual snooping.

Here is the code for the custom EditTextPreference class:

package com.Merlinia.OutBack_Client;

import android.content.Context;
import android.preference.EditTextPreference;
import android.util.AttributeSet;
import android.util.Base64;

import com.Merlinia.MEncryption_Main.MEncryptionUserPassword;


/**
 * This class extends the EditTextPreference view, providing encryption and decryption services for
 * OutBack user passwords. The passwords in the preferences store are first encrypted using the
 * MEncryption classes and then converted to string using Base64 since the preferences store can not
 * store byte arrays.
 *
 * This is largely copied from this article, except for the encryption/decryption parts:
 * https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/android-developers/pMYNEVXMa6M
 */
public class EditPasswordPreference  extends EditTextPreference {

    // Constructor - needed despite what compiler says, otherwise app crashes
    public EditPasswordPreference(Context context) {
        super(context);
    }


    // Constructor - needed despite what compiler says, otherwise app crashes
    public EditPasswordPreference(Context context, AttributeSet attributeSet) {
        super(context, attributeSet);
    }


    // Constructor - needed despite what compiler says, otherwise app crashes
    public EditPasswordPreference(Context context, AttributeSet attributeSet, int defaultStyle) {
        super(context, attributeSet, defaultStyle);
    }


    /**
     * Override the method that gets a preference from the preferences storage, for display by the
     * EditText view. This gets the base64 password, converts it to a byte array, and then decrypts
     * it so it can be displayed in plain text.
     * @return  OutBack user password in plain text
     */
    @Override
    public String getText() {
        String decryptedPassword;

        try {
            decryptedPassword = MEncryptionUserPassword.aesDecrypt(
                     Base64.decode(getSharedPreferences().getString(getKey(), ""), Base64.DEFAULT));
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            decryptedPassword = "";
        }

        return decryptedPassword;
    }


    /**
     * Override the method that gets a text string from the EditText view and stores the value in
     * the preferences storage. This encrypts the password into a byte array and then encodes that
     * in base64 format.
     * @param passwordText  OutBack user password in plain text
     */
    @Override
    public void setText(String passwordText) {
        byte[] encryptedPassword;

        try {
            encryptedPassword = MEncryptionUserPassword.aesEncrypt(passwordText);
        } catch (Exception e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
            encryptedPassword = new byte[0];
        }

        getSharedPreferences().edit().putString(getKey(),
                                          Base64.encodeToString(encryptedPassword, Base64.DEFAULT))
                .commit();
    }


    @Override
    protected void onSetInitialValue(boolean restoreValue, Object defaultValue) {
        if (restoreValue)
            getEditText().setText(getText());
        else
            super.onSetInitialValue(restoreValue, defaultValue);
    }
}

This shows how it can be used - this is the "items" file that drives the preferences display. Note it contains three ordinary EditTextPreference views and one of the custom EditPasswordPreference views.

<PreferenceScreen xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android">

    <EditTextPreference
        android:key="@string/useraccountname_key"
        android:title="@string/useraccountname_title"
        android:summary="@string/useraccountname_summary"
        android:defaultValue="@string/useraccountname_default"
        />

    <com.Merlinia.OutBack_Client.EditPasswordPreference
        android:key="@string/useraccountpassword_key"
        android:title="@string/useraccountpassword_title"
        android:summary="@string/useraccountpassword_summary"
        android:defaultValue="@string/useraccountpassword_default"
        />

    <EditTextPreference
        android:key="@string/outbackserverip_key"
        android:title="@string/outbackserverip_title"
        android:summary="@string/outbackserverip_summary"
        android:defaultValue="@string/outbackserverip_default"
        />

    <EditTextPreference
        android:key="@string/outbackserverport_key"
        android:title="@string/outbackserverport_title"
        android:summary="@string/outbackserverport_summary"
        android:defaultValue="@string/outbackserverport_default"
        />

</PreferenceScreen>

As for the actual encryption/decryption, that is left as an exercise for the reader. I'm currently using some code based on this article http://zenu.wordpress.com/2011/09/21/aes-128bit-cross-platform-java-and-c-encryption-compatibility/, although with different values for the key and the initialization vector.

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You can also check out this little lib, containing the functionality you mention.

https://github.com/kovmarci86/android-secure-preferences

It is similar to some of the other aproaches here. Hope helps :)

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First of all I think User's data shouldn't be stored on phone, and if it is must to store data somewhere on the phone it should be encrypted with in the apps private data. Security of users credentials should be the priority of the application.

The sensitive data should be stored securely or not at all. In the event of a lost device or malware infection, data stored insecurely can be compromised.

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shared preferences is easiest way to store our application data. but it is possible that anyone can clear our shared preferences data through application manager.so i don't think it is completely safe for our application.

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you need to use the sqlite, security apit to store the passwords. here is best example, which stores passwords, -- passwordsafe. here is link for the source and explanation -- http://code.google.com/p/android-passwordsafe/

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2  
The OP needs to store one username and password pair. It would be ridiculous to consider creating an entire database table for this one use –  HXCaine May 25 '10 at 14:27
    
@HXCaine i respectfully disagree - i can see at least 1 other use of a user/passwords sqlite table. IF YOU CONSIDER THE RISK (of using sqlite) ACCEPTABLE, besides simple application login authentication, you could use the table to store multiple ftp passwords (if your app uses ftp - mine do sometimes), for example. plus, creating a sqlite adapter class for this manipulation is boilerplate simple. –  tony gil Jul 22 '12 at 14:40
    
Nice resurrection of a two-year-old comment! To be fair, my comment was a year after the answer :) Even with a handful of FTP passwords, the overhead is much larger with an SQLite table than with SharedPreferences both in terms of space and coding. Surely that can't be necessary –  HXCaine Jul 24 '12 at 21:01

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