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Above question was asked to me in my interview. Though I am still waiting for the result, I am wondering if my approach is correct or if there is any better solution?

 struct Node  
 {   
  int data;  
  Node * next;    
 };  
 Node *function( struct Node *head)   
 {    
    if ( ! head)   
    {   
        std::cout <<" no linked present";  
        return 0;  
    }  

    Node  *current, *temp;  
    temp = NULL;
    current = head;  
    int counter = 0;  
    while( current != NULL)   
    {
        counter ++;  
        current = current->next;   
        if( counter >= 5)   
        {
            if( temp == NULL)  
                temp = head;   
            else
            temp = temp->next;  
        }  

    }  
     return (temp);    
   }    

IF you guys have better optimal solution , please post it here. Thanks to everyone Sam

share|improve this question
    
by the way, where is temp declared? – Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 16:32
    
@Vlad, Thanks for pointing it out. I have made the changes – samprat Oct 22 '11 at 16:37
    
okay, with the new edit: you forgot to initialize temp with NULL. – Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 16:37
    
Thanks to everyone for helping me out and many thanks to Vlad and Nick for pointing out my silly mistake which cost be dearly during interview process – samprat Oct 22 '11 at 16:41
    
I don't think a sane interviewer would base his/her decision on whether you declared all the temporaries. In the real life, the first attempt to compile the code would report the uninitialized variable to you immediately. – Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 16:43
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For the single-linked list your solution should be optimal. For the double-linked list, you could go from the back.

share|improve this answer
    
Please check out the edit in my answer, you made a good point but I explained it further. – Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 16:43

If you exclude the case where the list is less than 5 elements long, I would say the next solution is a bit more elegant, but it's essentially the same thing:

Node *function( struct Node *head)  
{
   while ( head->next->next->next->next )
      head = head->next;
   return head 
}

Performance-wise, for a single-linked list, you can't do better than O(n), so all that can be improved is the readability.

EDIT:

Vlad made an interesting point in the comments, that in every iteration of the loop more instructions are performed. I believe that is wrong, as pointer access only requires 1 asm instructions. However, in the OP's code:

   counter ++;  
   current = current->next;   
   if( counter >= 5)   
   {
       if( temp == NULL)  
           temp = head;   
       else
           temp = temp->next;  
   }  

are the instructions executed in the loop. This is way less efficient. Increment, 2 pointer assignements and 2 comparisons...

Both are O(n), but for large inputs it matters whether the time is 4*n or 10*n.

share|improve this answer
    
Your solution is more elegant, but does more in each iteration. The OP's solution makes only two advances (and one increment, which could be eliminated). As well, the OP's solution can be parametrized, whereas yours has 5 hardcoded. – Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 16:36
    
@Vlad I will update my answer, please read, you might find it interesting. – Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 16:39
    
well, in order to be more efficient I would make small changes in the OP's code: (1) increase the counter only if counter < 5 (in the else clause) (2) skip check if (temp == NULL) and initialize temp by head before the loop (this would require a one-time check whether counter is < 5 or not before return). This way we have: 2 indirect accesses, 2 assignments and 1 comparison per iteration. In your case, we've got 5 indirect accesses and 2 assignments per iteration. – Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 16:49
    
"pointer access only requires 1 asm instructions", sure but pointer indirection requires memory access which, since we're generalizing, is way worse. Also all the accesses will depend on each other unlike the OPs code. </pedantic> – user786653 Oct 22 '11 at 16:50
    
@Vlad I'm pretty sure the compiler can optimize better than the two of us. A lot better. I don't have a compiler on hand as I'm not using my computer right now, but I'm pretty sure that with full optimization(no point comparing performance without optimization) the generated code would be similar. If you can do it, please post the generated code for both cases. – Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 16:51

That looks like it would work fine. Only issue is that you have not declared temp in your code, and have not initialized it to NULL.

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