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Hey everyone I'm studying for a midterm exam and I'm studying the sample midterm from a previous semester, the answers are given but I'm trying to figure out how the answers came about. Question and answers below, I understand how he got "zero" but not the rest:

Write the 10-lines output of the program Bird.java shown below.

interface Silly {
   public void narf();
   public void poit(Silly s);
}

public class Bird implements Silly {
public static void main(String args[]) {
     System.out.println("zero");
     Silly s = new SillyBird(1);
     Silly s2 = new Loony();
     s.poit(s2);
     s2.poit(s);
     System.out.println("zymurgy");
   }
   public Bird() {
     this(0);
     System.out.println("zircon");
   }
   public Bird(int i) {
     System.out.println("zanzibar");
   }
   public void narf() {
     System.out.println("zort");
   }
   public void poit(Silly s) {
      s.narf();
   }
}

class SillyBird extends Bird {
   public SillyBird() {
     System.out.println("duchess");
   }
   public SillyBird(int i) {
      super(i);
   }
   public void narf() {
      System.out.println("drum");
      super.narf();
   }
}

class Loony extends SillyBird {
   public Loony() {
      System.out.println("stupendous");
   }
   public void narf() {
     System.out.println("snark");
   }
}

His answers are: zero zanzibar zanzibar zircon duchess stupendous snark drum zort zymurgy

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted
interface Silly {
   public void narf();
   public void poit(Silly s);
}

public class Bird implements Silly {
public static void main(String args[]) {
     System.out.println("zero");   // 1. zero
     Silly s = new SillyBird(1);   // 2. zanzibar
     Silly s2 = new Loony();       // 3. zanzibar zircon duchess stupendous
     s.poit(s2);                   // 4. snark
     s2.poit(s);                   // 5. drum zort
     System.out.println("zymurgy");// 6. zymurgy
   }
   public Bird() {
     this(0);
     System.out.println("zircon");
   }
   public Bird(int i) {
     System.out.println("zanzibar");
   }
   public void narf() {
     System.out.println("zort");
   }
   public void poit(Silly s) {
      s.narf();
   }
}

class SillyBird extends Bird {
   public SillyBird() {
     System.out.println("duchess");
   }
   public SillyBird(int i) {
      super(i);
   }
   public void narf() {
      System.out.println("drum");
      super.narf();
   }
}

class Loony extends SillyBird {
   public Loony() {
      System.out.println("stupendous");
   }
   public void narf() {
     System.out.println("snark");
   }
}

I hope this helps... I think the most important one to understand is number 3 where you have implicit super() calls.

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WHat you probably don't get is that whan a constructor doesn't explicitely invoke super(), then the compiler adds a super() call anyway, to the very beginning of the constructor. So,

public SillyBird() {
     System.out.println("duchess");
}

is equivalent to

public SillyBird() {
    super(); 
    System.out.println("duchess");
}

Add the super() calls at the very beginning of the constructors which don't have one, then follow the calls, and you'll find the answer. For example, the call to

Silly s2 = new Loony();

calls the Loony constructor, which calls super(). So the SillyBird no-arg constructor is called, which first calls super(). So the Bird no-arg constructor is called, which calls this(0). SO the 1-arg constructor of Bird is called, etc.

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If you don't understand how 'he got the rest' - you need to read a basic tutorial on objects, classes, and interfaces. Start with the one provided by Oracle. In a nutshell, the print statements occur in the same order the constructors and override methods are being executed. For example, the second word 'zanzibar' is printed because the

public SillyBird(int i) {
    super(i);
}

constructor is invoked Silly s = new SillyBird(1);, which invokes:

public Bird(int i) {
    System.out.println("zanzibar");
}

via the super(i) invocation.

Now try to reason through how the second 'zanzibar' print occurs.

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