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There is such code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int returnnumber() { return 2; }
std::string returntext() { return "siema"; }

int main() {

    std::cout << (returntext() += "cze") << std::endl; // siemacze
    //std::cout << (returnnumber() += 2) << std::endl; error: lvalue required as left operand of assignment

    return 0;
} 

Why is it possible to change return value of std::string, but not int?

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4 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

because std::string is a class type with a defined += operator as a member function.

and the standard allows you to call member functions on rvalues.

a silly consequence of that is that

struct S { int x; };
S foo() { return S(); }

int main()
{
    foo() = S();    // OK, uses member assignment operator.
    foo().x = 666;  // !Nah, can't assign to rvalue of built-in type.
}

compilation results:

Comeau C/C++ 4.3.10.1 (Oct  6 2008 11:28:09) for ONLINE_EVALUATION_BETA2
Copyright 1988-2008 Comeau Computing.  All rights reserved.
MODE:strict errors C++ C++0x_extensions

"ComeauTest.c", line 7: error: expression must be a modifiable lvalue
      foo().x = 666;  // !Nah, can't assign to rvalue of built-in type.
      ^

1 error detected in the compilation of "ComeauTest.c".

however, compilers differ (or used to differ) about how strictly they applied this subtle rule, or if at all.

cheers & hth.,

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Well, but for int the operator += is defined as well. –  Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 17:14
    
@downvoter: Why? –  Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 17:14
    
@anonymous downvoter: please explain your downvote so that others can benefit from your insight, or ignore some stupid reason. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 22 '11 at 17:19
    
@Vlad: for int the += is the built-in operator=, while for std::string it's a member function. I'm updating my answer to make that more clear. Cheers & hth., –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 22 '11 at 17:20
1  
@Vlad: I don't know, but regarding a very similar question Bjarne Stroustrup (the language designer) replied that it was mostly an historical accident. He had meant to sit down and address the issue, but found he didn't have time. There's much that is like that... Cheers, –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Oct 22 '11 at 17:25
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The left hand side of an assignment operator for a built-in type must be a modifiable lvalue but the return value of a function is always an rvalue if the function doesn't return a reference type.

operator+= is a member function of std::string and you can call a member function on an rvalue of class type.

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I wonder, why such inconsistency? –  Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 17:16
    
Did you mean "left hand side of an assignment operator?" –  Vaughn Cato Oct 22 '11 at 17:17
    
@VaughnCato: Yes, I did. Thanks. –  Charles Bailey Oct 22 '11 at 17:28
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For the same reason

std::string("siema") += "cze";

works.

You are constructing a new object and applying the operator += (which std::string has) to it.

Trying this with it won't work as your function returns an rvalue. It would be like:

2 += 2

You can toy around with this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int& returnnumber() { int * k = new int; *k = 2; return *k; }
std::string returntext() { return "siema"; }

int main() {

    std::cout << (returntext() += "cze") << std::endl; // siemacze
    std::cout << (returnnumber() += 2) << std::endl; //no error
    std::string("siema") += "cze";
    return 0;
} 

But this will lead to a memory leak, so don't do it. It's just a proof of concept that returning an lvalue would work.

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Hi Luchian :) Doesn't returntext return an rvalue as well? –  Vlad Oct 22 '11 at 17:21
    
Charles Bailey has written: but the return value of a function is always an rvalue if the function doesn't return a reference type. Then returntext returns rvalue or lvalue? –  scdmb Oct 22 '11 at 17:33
    
I'm confused, off to do some reading :) –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 17:39
    
returntext does indeed return an rvalue of type std::string (3.10/5 in C++03). The built-in assignments require an lvalue (this rule inherited from C, I suppose, although in theory C++ could have changed if it if wanted to). However member functions, including operators overloaded as members, can be called on rvalues. Since int doesn't have any member functions whereas string does, those two rules result in an inconsistency. In C++11 there are loads more types of *value, I still haven't got it all straight so I won't try to refer to it, but the effect is the same. –  Steve Jessop Oct 22 '11 at 19:29
    
@SteveJessop thanks for clarifying that. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 22 '11 at 19:30
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returntext() returns a std::string which can be modified in later stages say with +=operator. However, although returnnumber() returns an int, the function itself is returning 2 which is by defualt a const int and is not changeable and that's why compiler complains.

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