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I am trying to create a number of instances of the same custom object type called Question. The question class has getter functions to return the question and answer for the question. If I create just one question object everything works fine but if I create two with different names and variables when I call the getter function is always returns the value from the Question object most recently initialized.

This is what I mean:

Question q1 = new Question("What is the capital of France", "Paris");
Question q2 = new Question("What is the capital of England", "London");

System.out.println(q1.getQuestion());
System.out.println(q2.getQuestion());

In the console is displays

What is the capital of England
What is the capital of England

I am expecting to to display the two different questions.

Can anyone point me in the right direction?

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1  
Are the variables inside your class static? –  Ziyao Wei Oct 22 '11 at 17:34
2  
Show us the code for Question –  Pablo Fernandez Oct 22 '11 at 17:35
    
We need to see a bit more of code, for instance the implementation of Question, and the part where you're calling System.out.println(). Just by looking at what you've posted, nothing seems wrong and it's impossible to find the error –  Óscar López Oct 22 '11 at 17:37
    
Next time don't make folks guess. Show the important code. –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Oct 22 '11 at 18:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Without seeing the code I can only guess, but it would seem as though the Question class has a static variable instead of a member variable.

This is why some people advocate always prefacing your variables with this.question and this.answer so you know you're referring to the member variable, not any others. It would point out a bug like this very quickly.

So if you have

class Question {
    private static String question;
    private static String answer;

    public Question(String q, String a) {
        question = q;
        answer = a;
    }

    public String getQuestion() { return question; }
    public String getAnswer() { return answer; }

}

remove static so it's just

class Question {
    private String question;
    private String answer;

    public Question(String q, String a) {
        question = q;
        answer = a;
    }

    public String getQuestion() { return question; }
    public String getAnswer() { return answer; }

}
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I did have the variables set to static! Thanks so much for your help! –  TrueWheel Oct 22 '11 at 17:40
    
Just so you know, static means they belong to the Question class itself. It's like a community variable. Removing static makes it part of the individual objects created. (Note the difference between part of the class and part of the object. The class is the mold from which the objects are made. Well that's not a perfect analogy but it works :) –  corsiKa Oct 22 '11 at 18:05

When you use new operator, a new object is created for sure. But, if there is a static field declared in your class, it will be shared across all the instances of the particular class. Hence, the use of static would be the cause of this behavior.

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Thanks for your help! –  TrueWheel Oct 22 '11 at 17:53

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