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When reading questions on Stack Overflow or Stack Programmers, I often see answers which state that you should avoid (or at least have very little) global state in your programs. I'm writing a little program at the minute and I was concerned that I was introducing a lot of global state. Allow me to show you an example piece of code.

public class ContactUpdater
{
    //this is used in a few method and requires a web request so it's fairly
    //expensive to populate - therefore we only want to do it once.
    private Group _group;

    public ContactUpdater
    {
        _group = GetGroup();
    }
}

This approach meant that my code was littered with _group which felt ugly and wrong so I decided to use a property like so:

public class ContactUpdater
{
    private Group _group;
    private Group Group
    {
        get
        {
            if (_group == null)
            {
                _group = GetGroup();
            }
            return _group;
        }
    }

    public ContactUpdater()
    {
    }
}

Now I have an empty constructor and wherever I need to use the group, I now just call Group rather than _group.

I have a couple of questions:

  1. Am I using global state in both of these code snippets?
  2. Does the second example avoid global state?
  3. Is one of the code examples the preferred way of coding?
share|improve this question
1  
what does GetGroup() do? –  Conrad Frix Oct 22 '11 at 17:47
    
It uses Google's Contacts API to find a contacts group with a particular name. –  Stu Oct 22 '11 at 17:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As @Conrad Frix pointed out, it depends on what GetGroup() does. I would normally decouple the group from the updater with an interface and use constructor injection:

public class ContactUpdater
{
    public ContactUpdater(IGroup group)
    {
        _group = group;
    }

    private readonly IGroup _group;
}

This way ContactUpdater can be tested independently of Group and GetGroup() by passing in a fake or mock implementation of the IGroup interface.

You can create ContactUpdater manually, passing in the result of GetGroup(), or use a dependency injection framework.

I personally don't use private properties for encapsulation often (I do sometimes), and I use the same underscore convention you do. I don't have a strong opinion on this. Try both and see what's easier to read and maintain.

Update: Since GetGroup() calls an external service, I would absolutely decouple that.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes sense now. Marking as the answer mostly because you also addressed the underscore convention. –  Stu Oct 23 '11 at 9:43

Since it's not clear what GetGroup() does you may or may not be using Global state. Both the Field and the Property are nicely encapsulated so that isn't.

However this is a property getter that has a side effect on the property. This is bad news since it violates the principle of least surprise. Also it can make debugging difficult since even hovering over it in the IDE will mutate it.

get
{
    if (_group == null)
    {
        _group = GetGroup();
 }
 return _group;

If you're using this to defer the loading of the Group with the Lazy load property you should as TrueWill notes use Lazy<T>

share|improve this answer
1  
It's a lazy-load pattern, though. I'd probably use Lazy<T> instead. –  TrueWill Oct 22 '11 at 17:56
    
@TrueWill good point. I've updated my answer –  Conrad Frix Oct 22 '11 at 18:01

Both ways are ok. So, you are not using global states in those codes. However, it is possible that none of those is the best approach. The best one could be inject that dependency in the class constructor in order to decouple that Group class. If you do that, your ContactUpdater class will be isolated from the Group class and you will be able to unit test the code. More over, you will be able to use the same Group instance in all the ContactUpdater instances.

class Group : IGroup { .... }

public class ContactUpdater
{
    private IGroup _group;

    public ContactUpdater(IGroup group)
    {
        _group = group;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - you beat me to it by about a minute! I suggest making the private field readonly, though. –  TrueWill Oct 22 '11 at 18:12
    
yes, a readonly field is a good recomendation. –  lontivero Oct 22 '11 at 18:36

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