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is there a Performance difference between this:

int test;
void Update()
{
    test +=2;
}

and this:

void Update()
{
    int test;
    test +=2;
}

--

int main()
{
    while(true)
        Update();
}

I ask because the second Code is better to read (you don't need to declare it at Class headers), so i would use it if the performance is not lower.

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1  
Your tests are not congruent because the scope of test dictates the meaning of what happens. –  San Jacinto Oct 22 '11 at 18:05

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It is highly unlikely that there is a performance difference between the two snippets only profiling your code can tell reliably but there is a important functional difference tha you should consider here.

If your test variable is needed only inside the function update() then you must declare it inside the function. That way the variable has a limited scope inside the function.The lifetime of such a local variable is limited to the scope where it resides.i.e. Within the function body, till the closing brace}.

If at all you want your test variable to maintain state across function calls then it can be a local static variable declared inside the function.

Declaring test outside the function makes it an global variable. And it can be accessible in any function in the same file.Also being a global variable it lifetime extends till end of program.

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Thank you, i knew about the functional difference, i choosed a bad example ;) Btw, if i use static int; in a function, is this then also static across instances of classes? –  Sapd Oct 22 '11 at 18:16
    
@Sapd: A static int variable declared inside a function will be shared across all the calls that are made to the function.Yes, it will be maintained across all instances of classes. –  Alok Save Oct 22 '11 at 18:19

Performance difference, unlikely. This is simple to test, but depends on your compiler. Check the output assembly and do some benchmarking. If there is a difference, it's likely to be tiny.

However, there is a major functional difference. The second example is effectively useless, as test will be reset every Update. To avoid that, you could declare it as static int test, but you've essentially written the first example again.

So, they are very different things, but will have similar performance.

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