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I'm creating a c++ library that makes heavy use of smart pointers, both in public interface and internally. Currently it is "header-only", but as it evolves it is becoming clear that this may not be appropriate.

I don't want to dictate a choice of smart pointer implementation to library users. I also have gotten pretty far without bringing in any dependencies (such as boost), and would like to stay dependency-free as long as possible. The library isn't targeting c++0x, and (unsurprisingly) wants to stay as standards-compliant as possible.

Currently, my solution for letting users select an implementation looks like this:

#ifndef MYLIB_MEMORY_H_
#define MYLIB_MEMORY_H_

#if MYLIB_STD_SMART_PTR
  #include <memory>
  #define MYLIB_SHARED_PTR std::shared_ptr
  #define MYLIB_WEAK_PTR std::weak_ptr
  #define MYLIB_STATIC_POINTER_CAST std::static_pointer_cast
#elif MYLIB_STD_TR1_SMART_PTR
  #include <tr1/memory>
  #define MYLIB_SHARED_PTR std::tr1::shared_ptr
  #define MYLIB_WEAK_PTR std::tr1::weak_ptr
  #define MYLIB_STATIC_POINTER_CAST std::tr1::static_pointer_cast
#elif MYLIB_BOOST_SMART_PTR
  #include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
  #define MYLIB_SHARED_PTR boost::shared_ptr
  #define MYLIB_WEAK_PTR boost::weak_ptr
  #define MYLIB_STATIC_POINTER_CAST boost::static_pointer_cast
#else
  #error Please define one of MYLIB_STD_SMART_PTR, MYLIB_STD_TR1_SMART_PTR or MYLIB_BOOST_SMART_PTR
#endif

#endif // MYLIB_MEMORY_H_

Since the library is currently header-only, choosing a macro at (client) compile time is sufficient. I'm afraid that if I move to a shared library, this trick will break down and I'll have to find another way.

What might that other way be?

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3  
You aren't really giving the user much flexibility at all, except in letting them chose which name to use for the boost definition of a shared pointer. –  Dennis Zickefoose Oct 22 '11 at 18:38
    
I'm aiming for the 80% solution. It seems at least one of the three choices above are available in most environments. My interest is more in avoiding converting pointers between implementations than offering universal flexibility. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 18:43
    
@Dennis: do there exist C++ implementations that include std::tr1::shared_ptr or std::shared_ptr out of the box, but don't include Boost? If so, then this provides the flexibility to use this header on that implementation without bothering to go install Boost. Of course, one can argue that everyone should install all of Boost always (or at least this much of it), but that argument in effect just says, "never mind the standard, use Boost instead". Even Boost doesn't really think that. –  Steve Jessop Oct 22 '11 at 18:45
    
@Steve: I was simply pointing out that there is a difference between "choosing a smart pointer implementation" and "choosing whether or not to to install boost." Its still a useful question, though, I agree, and an "80% solution" is better than nothing... I know I've avoided libraries in the past that required the use of boost. –  Dennis Zickefoose Oct 22 '11 at 19:02
    
I'm trying to understand the logic here. You require your users to use some from of shared_ptr. Indeed, your library cannot be used without one. But you don't provide one with your library. So if someone happens to use a C++ compiler that doesn't have it's own, and since you don't provide one, they cannot use your library. So your library has a dependency on Boost as the only fallback if no shared_ptr comes with the compiler. It would be better if you either shipped a particular portion of Boost (using bcp) or otherwise just admitted the dependency and accept the consequences. –  Nicol Bolas Oct 22 '11 at 19:10

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Not an answer

I would take a different approach to the selection of the shared pointer, mainly because I dislike macros.

#if MYLIB_STD_SMART_PTR
  #include <memory>
namespace mylib {
  using std::shared_ptr;
  using std::weak_ptr;
  using std::static_pointer_cast;
}
#elif MYLIB_STD_TR1_SMART_PTR
  #include <tr1/memory>
namespace mylib {
  using std::tr1::shared_ptr;
  using std::tr1::weak_ptr;
  using std::tr1::static_pointer_cast
}
#elif MYLIB_BOOST_SMART_PTR
  #include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
namespace mylib {
  using boost::shared_ptr;
  using boost::weak_ptr;
  using boost::static_pointer_cast;
}
#else
  #error Please define one of MYLIB_STD_SMART_PTR, MYLIB_STD_TR1_SMART_PTR or MYLIB_BOOST_SMART_PTR
#endif

Now, relating to the actual question, if the smart pointers are used as part of the public interface of a compiled in library you will have to provide different binaries and have the user pick which binary to link against. Then again, I would try avoiding the use of shared_ptr in the API of a library, as it forces your choice of smart pointer onto your users (unless, of course, your library does share the pointers with the clients), and rather use std::auto_ptr that has the advantage of being able to manage the memory automatically and at the same time allow the user to decide to move the resource to any other type of pointer by calling release() (once a shared_ptr obtains ownership of a resource, it cannot give ownership back).

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I like the delegated namespace idea, thank you. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 19:17
    
The library is a glorified factory pattern. As such it really does manage the lifespan of created objects (by caching them); I think some flavor of shared_ptr is appropriate. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 19:19
    
@phs: Does the library keep copies of all the shared_ptr's that it returns? That is not so common in the factory pattern. Unless you have a strong reason to control the lifespan of the objects in the library, I would avoid the complexity, and if you need to manage the lifetime in the library, then you probably don't want to provide shared_ptrs, as that will share (i.e. dilute) the responsibility and the library will no longer manage the objects. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Oct 22 '11 at 19:25
    
Yes, it optionally caches created instances in a certain, critical way. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 19:30
    
The key realization you and @SteveJessop saw was the variation in ABI. Compiling separate versions for each option seems to be the only way to satisfy my requirements if I move to a shared library. Thanks! –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 21:39

I think that objects that are owned by your library (your library is responsible for its destruction) should be kept in any way you see fit. Destruction method of objects that are not owned by your library should be left for the client to decide (meaning you should probably just get a regular pointer).

Now we are left with objects that have shared ownership (e.g. shared_ptr or some other reference counted objects). What you can do here is get a call back for each referenced counted object for decreasing its reference count. You can decide on a fixed signature and the client can always use an adapter when needed.

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Do these macro-ed shared pointer types appear in the API to your library?

If so, then you have a problem, since even in a single implementation boost::shared_ptr and std::shared_ptr may be different types. You can't share ownership of an object unless the two people sharing use the same shared_ptr, so you have to pick one. Probably boost::shared_ptr, and ship that part of Boost with your library headers. This is what bcp is for.

If not, then the trick continues to work -- if users compile your library for themselves then they can pick one (or I suppose you could autoconf it). If you compile your library and ship binaries, use whatever you like, it won't introduce any dll dependencies that weren't there already.

If it's currently part of the interface, but it doesn't need to be because your library doesn't actually share ownership with the user, then you could try changing the interface. For example, when returning a newly-allocated object, don't return shared_ptr, return auto_ptr instead. Sure, it's deprecated in C++11, but at least it exists, which is more than can be said for any other smart pointer and C++03. Your user can then immediately convert to a proper smart pointer of their choice.

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Yes, the chosen shared_ptr namespace (necessarily) appears in the public interface. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 18:59
    
@phs: then you need to pick a type that can be bolted on to an implementation that lacks it, hence nothing in std. You still have a potential problem that different versions of Boost itself might be incompatible, but that's the usual business when any object type appears in an interface. –  Steve Jessop Oct 22 '11 at 19:06

You can still use such a method, just move the chose to when the user compiles your library rather than when they compile their own code. Then provide some appropriate typedefs in the headers that expose the correct types without the ugly macros.

This way, you also circumvent the issue of your library code being compiled with a version of boost::shared_ptr incompatible with the version the user has installed. Or a different version of the standard library, or whatever.

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Unfortunately the standard smart pointer implementations are templates, not types. I would need some kind of templated typedef. –  phs Oct 22 '11 at 19:15
    
@phs: Not to the templates, to the actual type. Instead of shared_ptr<Blah> foo(); have Blah::pointer foo(); or something similar. David R. also gives a good way to avoid having a bunch of MY_LIB_SHARED_POINTER<Blah>s running around in user code. –  Dennis Zickefoose Oct 22 '11 at 19:18

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