Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to restrict review posting text with (at the present) the following RegEx:

^([a-zA-Z0-9 _\.\'\"\(\)\!\?\&\@]){1,}$

However, the text itself needs to contain whitespace in the form of ' ', but I don't want to allow the first sentence to have whitespace, i.e. the post cannot have leading whitespace. For an example, (I'm going to use '_' to represent ' ' in the following example) the form would allow:

This is a sentence.

But it would NOT allow:

(Using '_' to represent ' ')

_This is a sentence

__This is a sentence

etc.

I tried to work with negations, but I just don't understand RegEx well enough to grasp how to do this. This whole field is just not sitting well with me, so hopefully someone can help. Thanks in advance!

NOTE: I need this in RegEx because I have a live-feed validator telling the user that his/her input is valid/invalid. Another option that will allow me this real-time awareness will be sufficient for my purposes, if you happen to think of something better.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can also use a negative lookahead:

^(?!\s)([a-zA-Z0-9 _.'"()!?&@]){1,}$
share|improve this answer
    
+1 ah, forgot about lookahead... again ;) (no need to escape the characters in the character group). –  Felix Kling Oct 22 '11 at 19:25
    
Nice and simple, thanks! :) I'll accept in 5min >.< –  Matt Oct 22 '11 at 19:28

If you only want to allow these characters with the restriction that the first one should not be a whitespace, you have to repeat the character group:

/^[a-zA-Z0-9 _.'"()!?&@][a-zA-Z0-9 _.'"()!?&@\s]+$/

Or you make two tests:

if(!/^\s/.test(str) && /^[a-zA-Z0-9 _.'"()!?&@]+$/.test(str)) {
    // valid
}
share|improve this answer
    
This only prevents 1 instance of ' ', how do I expand that to prevent a theoretical infinite amount? –  Matt Oct 22 '11 at 19:25
    
@Matt: Are you talking about the first or second expression? If the first character is not a white space, everything is fine, isn't it? –  Felix Kling Oct 22 '11 at 19:27
    
No, I needed the absence of any amount of whitespace prior to text. That's why I showed the example above with 2 whitespaces also not working. –  Matt Oct 22 '11 at 19:29
    
@Matt: I think you are over-complicating the problem. No matter how many whitespace there are at the beginning, the first character will always be one. Therefore it is sufficient to test the first character only. If it is not a white space, it is a letter, so there are no leading white spaces. But I'm actually not sure how you are applying the expression, so maybe I'm missing something. –  Felix Kling Oct 22 '11 at 19:32

Just use ^\S at the beginning of your regex, where the '^' is the beginning of the string, and '\S' is the negation of the whitespace character class.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.