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I have

Private Declare Function ReadProcessMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "ReadProcessMemory" (ByVal hProcess As Integer, ByVal lpBaseAddress As Integer, ByRef lpBuffer As Integer, ByVal nSize As Integer, ByRef lpNumberOfBytesWritten As Integer) As Integer

But I also need

Private Declare Function ReadProcessMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "ReadProcessMemory" (ByVal hProcess As Integer, ByVal lpBaseAddress As Integer, ByRef lpBuffer As Single, ByVal nSize As Integer, ByRef lpNumberOfBytesWritten As Integer) As Integer

And some other variations. So, as in the example above, lpBuffer as Single instead of Integer. How can I achieve this?

UPDATE: Alrighty, now I'm doing this:

Imports System.Math
Imports System.Threading
Imports System.Runtime.InteropServices

Public Class Form1

'Declare ReadProcessMemory with lpBuffer As IntPtr
Private Declare Function ReadProcessMemory Lib "kernel32" Alias "ReadProcessMemory" (ByVal hProcess As Integer, ByVal lpBaseAddress As Integer, ByRef lpBuffer As IntPtr, ByVal nSize As Integer, ByRef lpNumberOfBytesWritten As Integer) As Integer

'This is the function I am now having trouble with
Public Function memfloat(ByVal address As Long, ByVal processHandle As IntPtr)
        Dim floatvalueinmemory As Single
        ReadProcessMemory(processHandle, address, floatvalueinmemory, 4, 0)
        Dim letstryagain As Single 'floatvalueinmemory didn't give the desired result, so going to try to TryParse
        Single.TryParse(floatvalueinmemory, letstryagain)
        Return CStr(letstryagain) 'returns the same result as floatvalueinmemory did
    End Function

End Class

Partial Public Class NativeMethods
    <DllImport("user32.dll")> _
    Public Shared Function ReadProcessMemory(ByVal hProcess As System.IntPtr, ByVal lpBaseAddress As IntPtr, ByVal lpBuffer As System.IntPtr, ByVal nSize As UInteger, ByVal lpNumberOfBytesRead As IntPtr) As Boolean
    End Function
End Class

The memfloat function used to return something like "-75,48196", now it returns something like "-1,012555E+09" (the actual values don't match, just using these as an example), this is why I wanted to declare multiple times in the first place.. how do I convert from the IntPtr to a Single ?

What does work is:

Public Function memstring(ByVal address As Long, ByVal length As Int32, ByVal processHandle As IntPtr)
    Dim stringinmemory As Long
    Dim ret1 As Byte() = Nothing
    Dim tStr(length) As Char
    Dim retStr As String = ""
    For i As Int32 = 0 To length - 1
        ReadProcessMemory(processHandle, address + i, stringinmemory, 1, 0)
        ret1 = BitConverter.GetBytes(stringinmemory)
        tStr(i) = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(ret1) : retStr += tStr(i)
    Next
    Return retStr
End Function

This correctly returns the memory value as string. So yeah, now it's just the Single that's causing issues.

share|improve this question
    
The two declarations are valid for 32-bit environment and can be used together (although they might be not what you actually wanted, in case you need to read more than one integer/single). What is the problem? –  GSerg Oct 22 '11 at 22:21
    
@GSerg The problem is I can't declare ReadProcessMemory twice. –  natli Oct 22 '11 at 22:48
2  
I still don't get it. You can declare ReadProcessMemory twice. This is called overloading. It equally applies to both .net functions and declared PInvoke signatures. –  GSerg Oct 23 '11 at 9:06
    
@GSerg I didn't know what overloading was, I don't think it's anywhere in my code either so I don't know why you assumed that I did but thank you very much for posting back, now I know. I'm pretty new at this stuff. –  natli Oct 23 '11 at 14:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are using the Alias keyword anyway, so take advantage of it:

Private Declare Function ReadProcessMemoryInt Lib "kernel32" _
    Alias "ReadProcessMemory" (ByVal hProcess As Integer, _
                               ByVal lpBaseAddress As Integer, _
                               ByRef lpBuffer As Integer, _
                               ByVal nSize As Integer, _
                               ByRef lpNumberOfBytesWritten As Integer) As Integer

Private Declare Function ReadProcessMemorySingle Lib "kernel32" _
    Alias "ReadProcessMemory" (ByVal hProcess As Integer, _
                               ByVal lpBaseAddress As Integer, _
                               ByRef lpBuffer As Single, _
                               ByVal nSize As Integer, _
                               ByRef lpNumberOfBytesWritten As Integer) As Integer

The name you give to the function can be arbitrary. Only the Alias name must match the name in the library. In your code, you can refer to ReadProcessMemoryInt and ReadProcessMemorySingle (or whatever name you chose).

(Note: I didn't check whether you are actually using the API correctly, I've just answered your question about how to define the same API function twice with different signatures.)

share|improve this answer
    
I'm 99% that I am in fact not using the API correctly, so if someone could have a look at that, that would be appreciated. This definitely answers my question though, I can now get the Single and String in the correct (readable) formats. –  natli Oct 23 '11 at 8:51
    
@natli: Then I suggest that you start a new question on that topic, with a fitting title and tags. That way, you make sure that the WINAPI experts find your question. –  Heinzi Oct 25 '11 at 6:52

I fired up the P/Invoke Interop Assistant tool (link), found ReadProcessMemory and generated the signature in vb.net as:

Partial Public Class NativeMethods    
    '''Return Type: BOOL->int
    '''hProcess: HANDLE->void*
    '''lpBaseAddress: LPCVOID->void*
    '''lpBuffer: LPVOID->void*
    '''nSize: SIZE_T->ULONG_PTR->unsigned int
    '''lpNumberOfBytesRead: SIZE_T*
    <System.Runtime.InteropServices.DllImportAttribute("kernel32.dll", EntryPoint:="ReadProcessMemory")>  _
    Public Shared Function ReadProcessMemory(<System.Runtime.InteropServices.InAttribute()> ByVal hProcess As System.IntPtr, <System.Runtime.InteropServices.InAttribute()> ByVal lpBaseAddress As System.IntPtr, ByVal lpBuffer As System.IntPtr, ByVal nSize As UInteger, ByVal lpNumberOfBytesRead As System.IntPtr) As <System.Runtime.InteropServices.MarshalAsAttribute(System.Runtime.InteropServices.UnmanagedType.Bool)> Boolean
    End Function
End Class

So the bufffer is IntPtr that you need to convert into an array of various types. I suggest you look into the Marshal class and its static methods. Also here are links to possible relevant articles SO link,url 1,url 2. Translation from c# to vb.net may be needed. I also noticed on these online examples that the function definition can be overloaded (which surprised me).

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for your response, I'm now a little closer to achieving what I want to do. It's not working quite yet, though, I updated my answer. Am I correct to understand that what the Marshal class basically does is just allow passing a value in any shape or form using IntPtr rather than pre-defining it? Sorry if that is completely wrong but I'm a novice and that's what I gathered from reading up on it. –  natli Oct 23 '11 at 8:01

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