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I need some help to write a Regex for character matching. The scenario is that I have a text file with about 300 000 lines, with one word on each line. I need to find the words that match a certain set of characters.

Think of Scrabble as a very similar example, where a user has a set of characters, say for example P E S plus a wildcard character that can match any character (but only once).

If the text file contains the following words:

  • PIE
  • PIES
  • PEES
  • PASS
  • PLEASE

...only the words in bold should be matched, as each of the user's characters, including the wildcard, can only be used maximum once in matching.

Is there a way to write a regex expression for this?

I have started with...:

\b[P,E,S]\b

...but don't know how I should express that:

  1. Each character (P, E, S) can only be used once
  2. Any character (the wildcard) can also be used once

Thank you in advance! Please let me know if I need to clarify the problem.

// Peter

share|improve this question
    
So the wildcard character can occur anywhere in the word, yes? – ScottSEA Oct 22 '11 at 22:26
    
What regular expression engine/version are you using? – clarkb86 Oct 22 '11 at 22:50
1  
This "class" of problems is resolved with trie stackoverflow.com/questions/7418910/… here Lippert explains how to solve it. Regexes aren't the final wildcard to all the problems. – xanatos Oct 22 '11 at 23:18

This is not very easy with regex (if at all possible). Much simpler would be something like this:

List<char> set = new List<char>("PES");

string s = "PIES";

bool matches = s.Count(ch => !set.Remove(ch)) < 2;
share|improve this answer

Impossible is nothing :

You can do this with regexes using lookahaeds :

(?=^.+$)(?=^[^P]*?P?[^P]*?$)(?=^[^E]*?E?[^E]*?$)(?=^[^S]*?S?[^S]*?$)

Basically if you break it down there are five components :

First lookahead :

(?=^.+$)

Checks if length is >= 1

Then the three parts :

(?=^[^P]*?P?[^P]*?$)

for E and S respectively check if a maximum of 1 of these characters exist.

The above simply tells to check the whole string for a single occurrence of P. If more than one P is found the regex fails. Same is applied to the following two lookaheads.

For the wildcard I have to think a smart way to do it :)..

share|improve this answer
    
I may be wrong, but it seems to me that the words can be longer than 4 characters in the actual text file. – clarkb86 Oct 22 '11 at 23:05
    
From what he has written, it seems that you don't need to use all the caracters, so PI and PE would both be valid – xanatos Oct 22 '11 at 23:07
    
Well then maybe "" is also valid I guess :) – FailedDev Oct 22 '11 at 23:17
    
@FailedDev Yes, but it's 0 Scrabble points :-) – xanatos Oct 23 '11 at 5:50
    
@Kobi Yeah I agree... I mean it's possible with regex but..quite complex and inefficient. – FailedDev Oct 23 '11 at 10:22

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