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I am trying to follow an example from an online tutorial regarding basic client-server socket programming using standard Python libraries (version 2.7), but I cannot get the example to work under Windows (Vista). It works fine in Ubuntu 11.10, so I know that the following code at least works in a UNIX-based environment:

import optparse, os, socket, time

def parse_args():
    parser = optparse.OptionParser(usage)

    help = "The port to listen on. Default to a random available port."
    parser.add_option('--port', type='int', help=help)

    help = "The interface to listen on. Default is localhost."
    parser.add_option('--iface', help=help, default='localhost')

    help = "The number of seconds between sending bytes."
    parser.add_option('--delay', type='float', help=help, default=.1)

    help = "The number of bytes to send at a time."
    parser.add_option('--num-bytes', type='int', help=help, default=10)

    options, args = parser.parse_args()
    if len(args) != 1:
        parser.error('Provide exactly one poetry file.')   
    poetry_file = args[0]
    if not os.path.exists(args[0]):
        parser.error('No such file: %s' % poetry_file)
    return options, poetry_file


def send_poetry(sock, poetry_file, num_bytes, delay):
    inputf = open(poetry_file)
    while True:
        bytes = inputf.read(num_bytes)
        if not bytes:
            sock.close()
            inputf.close()
            return

        print 'Sending %d bytes' % len(bytes)

        try:
            sock.sendall(bytes) # this is a blocking call
        except socket.error:
            sock.close()
            inputf.close()
            return

        time.sleep(delay)


def serve(listen_socket, poetry_file, num_bytes, delay):
    while True:
        sock, addr = listen_socket.accept()
        print 'Somebody at %s wants poetry!' % (addr,)
        send_poetry(sock, poetry_file, num_bytes, delay)


def main():
    options, poetry_file = parse_args()
    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    sock.setsockopt(socket.SOL_SOCKET, socket.SO_REUSEADDR, 1)
    sock.bind((options.iface, options.port or 0))
    sock.listen(5)
    print 'Serving %s on port %s.' % (poetry_file, sock.getsockname()[1])
    serve(sock, poetry_file, options.num_bytes, options.delay)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()



The program stops responding as soon as the socket calls accept() in the serve() function, and none of the requested data is received as far as I can tell. What am I overlooking regarding Windows' handling of sockets?

share|improve this question
    
How do you know the program stops responding at the 'accept'? Do you see the "Somebody wants poetry' message? –  David Poole Oct 22 '11 at 23:10
    
Because I set a breakpoint after the statement which is never reached. So no, I do not see the "Somebody wants poetry" message. –  clarkb86 Oct 22 '11 at 23:20
2  
If you get stuck on 'accept', no one is connecting to your socket. Try telnet to connect to the port. The answer below has good info, too. –  David Poole Oct 22 '11 at 23:46
    
Yes, it looks as though the client is not connecting to the socket endpoint. I think it has something to do with Windows not allowing reuse of the localhost interface (which was a feature that was intentionally being featured by the author of the tutorial that I am following) - but I haven't been able to find a workaround yet. –  clarkb86 Oct 23 '11 at 0:00
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1 Answer

It looks like you may need to have it running in 2 different processes or split the client and server into 2 different threads. I got this to work on my Win7 box just now:

client.py

import socket

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.connect(("localhost", 4242))
while True:
    line = input("String to send: ")
    s.send(line.encode("utf-8"))

server.py:

import socket

s = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
s.bind(("0.0.0.0", 0))
s.listen(5)
client, address = s.accept()
while 1:
    data = client.recv(1024)
    if data:
        client.send(data)
        print(data.decode("utf-8"))

Results:

C:\Users\jon\Desktop>python.exe client.py
String to send: "Hello!"

Separate Console

C:\Users\jon\Desktop>python server.py
Hello!

More good info on the Winsock Programmer’s FAQ


The script your using hangs at sock, addr = listen_socket.accept() (until a timeout is reached if one is set with sock.settimeout(x)). If using sock.setblocking(0), the exception socket.error: [Errno 10035] A non-blocking socket operation could not be completed immediately is thrown at the accept() line and this is what happens with a timeout:

def serve(listen_socket, poetry_file, num_bytes, delay):
    while True:
        print "accepting data"
        try:
            sock, addr = listen_socket.accept()
        except socket.error, e:
            print e
        else:
            print 'Somebody at %s wants poetry!' % (addr,)
            send_poetry(sock, poetry_file, num_bytes, delay)


def main():
    options, poetry_file = parse_args()
    sock = socket.socket(socket.AF_INET, socket.SOCK_STREAM)
    sock.bind((options.iface, options.port or 0))
    sock.listen(5)
    sock.settimeout(5)
    print 'Serving %s on port %s.' % (poetry_file, sock.getsockname()[1])
    serve(sock, poetry_file, options.num_bytes, options.delay)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()

Results in:

C:\Users\jon\Desktop>python.exe test.py poetry.txt                                              
Serving poetry.txt on port 25355.                                                                   
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data                                                                                      
timed out                                                                                           
accepting data  
share|improve this answer
    
Well first of all, thanks for going through the trouble of testing all that out for me. I really would, however, like to know why my code doesn't work in Windows, as I believe it relates to something important that could come up again down the road. After some more research, I believe the problem is related to the SO_REUSEADDR option that I am using. This option [should] allow the client and server to both run on the localhost interface without any problems, but it's not. –  clarkb86 Oct 22 '11 at 23:54
    
In theory, that is correct. But from what I've read and after running some tests, it seems to work sometimes, but not others. I also read that restarting your PC actually gets it working for a while, but then it will eventually hang indefinitely like it is in our tests. More good info here: itamarst.org/writings/win32sockets.html –  chown Oct 23 '11 at 0:01
    
Heh, I found that article earlier today. The guy basically says (after what appears to be extensive research) that weird, inconsistent things happen in Windows, and that's just the way it is (and maybe it is). –  clarkb86 Oct 23 '11 at 0:06
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