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I have a method which loops over user elements, and sets a boolean value according to some given constraint:

public void checkUsers( int constraint ) {
    for(int i=0; i<nodeUsers().size(); i++) {
        UserElement elem = nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i);

        switch (constraint) {
          case CHECK_ALL:
              elem.setChecked(true); break;
          case CHECK_NONE:
               elem.setChecked(false); break;
          case CHECK_NO_LANG:
               if (elem.getLanguage() == null)
                   elem.setChecked(true);
               else
                   elem.setChecked(false);
               break;
          // More cases 		
        }
    }
}

I'm wondering if this solution is OK. Maybe I could better write different methods like:

public void checkAllUsers() {
    for(int i=0; i<nodeUsers().size(); i++) {
        UserElement elem = nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i);
        elem.setChecked(true);  
    }
}

public void checkNoUsers() {
    for(int i=0; i<nodeUsers().size(); i++) {
        UserElement elem = nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i);
        elem.setChecked(false); 
    }
}

// Edit: I've added a third case.

share|improve this question
    
I think it would be useful to see what the more complex cases are like. Some of the answers are really based on the assumption that ALL or NONE are the only options. –  Dave Costa Apr 24 '09 at 15:45
    
After seeing the edit: Jon Skeet wins. Everyone else should just delete their answers, since they don't really answer the question anymore. –  Michael Myers Apr 24 '09 at 15:56

8 Answers 8

up vote 16 down vote accepted

It seems to me that you could do this more effectively by making your constraint a real enum:

public enum Constraint
{
    CHECK_NONE
    {
        @Override void apply(UserElement element)
        {
            element.setChecked(false);
        }
    },
    CHECK_ALL
    {
        @Override void apply(UserElement element)
        {
            element.setChecked(true);
        }
    };

    public abstract void apply(UserElement element);
}

Then you can have:

public void checkUsers(Constraint constraint) {
    for(int i=0; i<nodeUsers().size(); i++) {
        UserElement elem = nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i);
        constraint.apply(elem);
    }
}

Alternatively, have an interface with the same "apply" method, and pass in an instance of the interface into your checkUsers method. It's the same basic pattern - separate the iteration over all user elements from "what to do with the element".

share|improve this answer
    
Aw, I got caught up in the specific problem instead of looking at the big picture. +1 –  Michael Myers Apr 24 '09 at 15:35
    
I'm stuck here with Java 1.4, so no enum. Isn't the interface approach a little bit overkill? –  Cantillon Apr 24 '09 at 15:48
    
@Lieven: If you really have more cases like your comment in the code says, this is definitely the way to go. Much more flexible, and your looping method won't get so bloated. –  Michael Myers Apr 24 '09 at 15:51
    
The power of enumerated types in Java... Oh, I like. –  Humphrey Bogart Apr 24 '09 at 15:51
    
@Lieven: No kill like overkill. If you're stuck in 1.4, use the typesafe enum pattern. Just give it a private constructor, and have some public static final instances of your class right in there. They can still be anonymous inner classes. –  Adam Jaskiewicz Apr 24 '09 at 16:03

The second will perform slightly better, but it will vary depending on your JIT settings.

In the worst case scenario, the Constraint will be checked every iteration, which could lead to bad performance. In the best case the constraint is only checked once.

An alternate solution, which has all of the benefits, and none of the potential downsides :

public void checkUsers(bool setTo) {
    for(int i=0; i<nodeUsers().size(); i++) {
        UserElement elem = nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i);
        elem.setChecked(setTo); break;  
    }
share|improve this answer
    
As I mentioned in my answer, the break doesn't belong. –  Michael Myers Apr 24 '09 at 15:36
    
I'd amend this answer so that the setTo parameter has a default value of "true". That way calling checkUsers() does what you expect, and checkUsers(false) would uncheck them, which is also not very surprising. –  rmeador Apr 24 '09 at 15:39
    
@rmeador: No default parameters in Java. The only way to get that effect is to create a parameterless overload which calls checkUsers(true). –  Michael Myers Apr 24 '09 at 15:42

You mentioned you are stuck in 1.4 in a comment, so this should get you started on something similar to what Jon Skeet suggested, but as a typesafe enum.

public abstract class Constraint {
  public static final Constraint CHECK_NONE = new Constraint(){
      @Override 
      public void apply(UserElement elem) {
        elem.setChecked(false);
      }
    };
  // etc. for other cases...

  // reduce visibility of ctor
  private Constraint() {};

  public abstract void apply();
}

Usage is the same as in Jon Skeet's answer.

Note that this is only needed if you're stuck on 1.4. If you're using modern Java, use a real enum.

share|improve this answer

The two-methods implementation is better. Your code will be easier for others to understand, since they will only need to read the method names, as opposed to having to understand what your parameter does in the first implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I was actually going to post an answer stating the opposite, but after reading this it does in fact make more sense to separate. –  TheTXI Apr 24 '09 at 15:30
    
But note his comment, "//More cases". We don't know how many there, are, but once you go beyond 2 it seems pretty silly to keep writing methods that do an identical loop with slightly different behavior inside. –  Dave Costa Apr 24 '09 at 15:44

Given that you're stuck in 1.4, I'd suggest extracting the case statement out of the loop, so that while you don't avoid the conditional, you at least isolate it. The loop becomes much simpler, the cyclomatic complexity goes down, and when you do get to switch to a more modern Java, you've got less code to look at for conversion (well, in one function you will be upgrading to exploit foreach; in another, to exploit better enums - but it's a separation of concerns):

public void checkUsers(int constraint) {
    for (int i = 0; i < nodeUsers().size(); i++)
    	checkUser(constraint, nodeUsers().getUsersElementAt(i));
}

private void checkUser(int constraint, UserElement elem) {
    switch (constraint) {
    case CHECK_ALL:
    	elem.setChecked(true);
    	break;
    case CHECK_NONE:
    	elem.setChecked(false);
    	break;
    case CHECK_NO_LANG:
    	if (elem.getLanguage() == null)
    		elem.setChecked(true);
    	else
    		elem.setChecked(false);
    	break;
    // More cases
    }
}

This is independent of whether you split the individual cases up into their own functions.

share|improve this answer
    
PS: for the final case, I'd just use elem.setChecked(elem.getLanguage() == null); –  Carl Manaster Apr 24 '09 at 16:06

i don't see why not, as long as you document everything right :)

you might calculate the length of your loop in advance ( saves time & resources )
so

nodeUsers().size() -> make it a variable :)

good luck :)

share|improve this answer
    
The JIT compiler does this for you. –  Jeremy Apr 24 '09 at 15:35
    
Ow indeed, java :D Sorry. –  mhd Apr 24 '09 at 18:12

This is a normal variation on the Visitor pattern. Lacking generics support isn't so much of an issue since you're only dispatching one type of value. The interface (or abstract type) implementation seems most correct; this both allows simpler unit testing and opens the door to better extensibility if your deployment case makes dependency injection an attractive option.

share|improve this answer

Oh, hell. This is better:

private void checkUser(int constraint, UserElement elem) {
    elem.setChecked(shouldCheck(constraint, elem));
}

private boolean shouldCheck(int constraint, UserElement elem) {
    switch (constraint) {
    case CHECK_ALL:	return true;
    case CHECK_NONE:	return false;
    case CHECK_NO_LANG:	return elem.getLanguage() == null;
    // More cases
    }
}

You avoid all the breaks.

share|improve this answer
    
Carl: You should have just edited your original post. <smile> –  Lawrence Dol Apr 25 '09 at 0:44
    
OK, thanks. Should I do that now, or has too much time passed for it to matter? –  Carl Manaster Apr 27 '09 at 16:15

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