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Lets say we have two defined function objects

add1 = lambda x: x+1

and

square = lambda x: x*x  

now I want to have a function that calls and adds the result of these two functions.
What I thought would work is:

def addFuncs(f,g):
    f+g

addFuncs(add1,square)(10)

Which I thought would give me an answer of 111 (10*10 + 10+1) But that just gave me an error TypeError: unsupported operand type(s) for +: 'function' and 'function'
So I tried:

def addFunctions(f, g):
    def getf():
        return f
    def getg():
        return g
    return getf() + getg()

But still to no avail...
However, if I do

def addFunctions(f, g):
    return f

it pops out with 100, so it seems to evaluate the function on return, But I can't figure out how to get it to evaluate the functions first and then operate on them.
Any help would be greatly appreciated!

EDIT
Got it!

def addFunctions(f, g):
    return lambda x: f(x) + g(x)
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted
def addFuncs(f,g):
    return lambda x: f(x) + g(x)

addFuncs(add1,square)(10)

Python doesn't support adding functions together which both of your attempts tried to do. Instead, you need to create a new function, such as with lambda which calls the original functions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Winston, This was spot on! –  Josha Inglis Oct 23 '11 at 0:55

Your original idea will work if you instead call these functions and then add their return values, rather than trying to add them themselves;

def addFuncs(f,g,x):
    f(x) + g(x)

This is because f and g are actually LambdaTypes, and the () operator calls them, allowing the + operator to add their return values. When you use the + operator on them directly, the + operator doesn't know how to add two LambdaTypes.

EDIT To add a little more; the reason

def addFunctions(f, g):
    def getf():
        return f
    def getg():
        return g
    return getf() + getg()

doesn't work is because you are, again, trying to add together two function objects. However, your example of

def addFunctions(f, g):
    return f

WILL work, because this will simply return another function object, which is then called with an argument of value 10 in your statement

addFuncs(add1,square)(10)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks staticfloat, Unfortunately that gave me the error TypeError: <lambda>() takes exactly 1 argument (0 given) but your telling me it was a Lambda type gave me the idea return lambda x: f(x) + g(x) which works! –  Josha Inglis Oct 23 '11 at 0:49
    
Yeap, looks like you might have missed my edit to include the "x" parameter in addFuncs, but Winston's answer is awesome because it creates a new lambda to pass the single argument into both with. :D –  staticfloat Oct 23 '11 at 1:18

addFuncs takes arbitrarily many functions as input and returns a function:

def addFuncs(*funcs):
    def _addFuncs(*args):
        return sum(f(*args) for f in funcs)
    return _addFuncs
add1 = lambda x: x+1
square = lambda x: x*x

print(addFuncs(add1,square)(10))

yields

111
share|improve this answer
    
That's really cool! I wouldn't have thought to use list comprehension in there. –  Josha Inglis Oct 23 '11 at 0:57

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