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An array parameter declaration causes a syntax error where the invocations happen. Yet the main method uses String[] instead of String... How can I understand this inconsistency?

package domain.test;

import utilities.CConsole;

public class Tester {
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
        Test1 t = new Test1();
        t.method1(0); // the array will exist but have a length of zero
        t.method1(0, (Object[])null); // the array will not exist
        t.method1(0, "a");
        t.method1(0, "a", "b");
        CConsole.pw.format("\n");

        t.method2(0); // the array will exist but have a length of zero
        t.method2(0, (String[])null); // the array will not exist
        t.method2(0, "a");
        t.method2(0, "a", "b");
        CConsole.pw.format("\n");
    }
}

class Test1 {
    void method1(int number, Object... args) // Object[] causes syntax errors
    {
        if (args == null)
            CConsole.pw.format("args == null\n");
        else
        {
            CConsole.pw.format("args != null    ");
            CConsole.pw.format("args.length %d\n", args.length);
        }
    }

    void method2(int number, String... args) // String[] causes syntax errors
    {
        if (args == null)
            CConsole.pw.format("args == null\n");
        else
        {
            CConsole.pw.format("args != null    ");
            CConsole.pw.format("args.length %d\n", args.length);
        }
    }
}

How can the inconsistency be explained?

The following is included for the person that said that it compiles: To get this error change method1() to use Object[].

Summary edit: The lesson seems to be this. As @Andrew Barber has emphasized, String... is distinct from String[]. They are not interchangeable generally, so do not try to treat them the same way (even though I could name reasons why they seem interchangeable). They are interchangeable in the case of main(). In the case of main() some people might call this sugar.

share|improve this question
2  
Using String[] in function arguments is valid, it shouldn't generate a syntax error. What errors does it print/ –  birryree Oct 23 '11 at 1:26
1  
Why should it give a syntax error? There's nothing wrong with using String[] as a parameter –  ryanprayogo Oct 23 '11 at 1:27
1  
What is the actual question here? –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 1:27
1  
I think your premise is wrong: void method1(int number, Object[] args){} is not a syntax error. –  Ted Hopp Oct 23 '11 at 1:30
3  
It's an error to declare an array argument and not pass in an array –  Dave Newton Oct 23 '11 at 1:35
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closed as not a real question by EJP, Kal, Andrew Barber, Chris, robertc Oct 24 '11 at 0:54

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In general , you can use varargs to specify the fact that a method is taking a variable number of arguments as input. Thus, collections, arrays, and simply individual objects can be sent interchangably in java. This simplifies methods but there are some gotchas.

Varargs work naturally if

1) They are at the END of a method signature 2) The type of data you are defining as the var arg is linear (i.e. an array or collection) .

As you can tell, main(String[] args) is thus a natural fit for using var args (that is, args is at the end of your method, it is the last parameter, so it is effectively the same as declaring "String... args" as the last parameter) . To understand them better I would suggest writing these two methods and watching what the compiler does :

So to answer your question : you got lucky :) Your method is sending a variable number of arguments to the main method, and new versions of java allow you to get away with var args as input to main.

share|improve this answer
    
"As you can tell, main(String[] args) is thus a natural fit for using var args." This is kind of vague. However, the last paragraph is the reason for the acceptance. –  broiyan Oct 23 '11 at 2:23
1  
@broiyan: Unfortunately, the last paragraph seems to be inaccurate, since you don't have any methods that call the main method. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 23 '11 at 2:46
    
I have a linux OS and an Eclipse IDE that calls it so it seems relevant. –  broiyan Oct 23 '11 at 4:25
    
@broiyan Linux doesn't call your main method. It calls the 'C' main() method in java.exe, which starts a JVM and sets up a JNI call to your Java main() method, which works because your main() method is defined as String[] like millions of main() methods before it since 1995; however since Java 1.5 String... also works. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 5:35
    
@EJP, I will rephrase it. I have systems that invoke main so it seems relevant. –  broiyan Nov 9 '11 at 0:25
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Varargs were added in later versions of the language. You can in fact use String ... over String[] in versions of Java that support varargs if you want for main.

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6  
@broiyan Because there is nothing wrong with that syntax. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 1:27
3  
You're getting syntax errors because you're calling the method incorrectly, not declaring it incorrectly. –  Chris Oct 23 '11 at 1:53
2  
I'm baffled why this answer has so many votes. It doesn't address the question. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 23 '11 at 2:47
1  
@broiyan, no, the syntax is not disallowed, anywhere. String[] is rejected as a semantic error when provided as an actual paramter that doesn't match the formal argument. If it was a syntax error, the compiler would say so, literally. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 4:19
1  
@RyanStewart - It certainly does answer the question: Varargs were added in later versions of the language. That's the answer to why main() is typically seen with String[] instead of String.... And it even goes beyond answering the question to correct the OP's assumption that main() cannot use String.... This is, in fact, a very good answer. It's clear, concise, and correct. –  aroth Oct 24 '11 at 0:58
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I think you're confused about what a valid array parameter looks like. A varargs parameter means you can pass 0 or more of whatever type is defined. If there's no ambiguity, you can pass an array, and the contents of the array will be expanded into the varargs argument.

An array parameter, on the other hand, means you must pass exactly one array. The errors in your example when you replace the varargs arguments with Object[] and String[] come from how you call the methods. For example:

t.method1(0, "a", "b");

This is fine for a varargs call, but as soon as you switch the varargs argument to an Object[], the previous method call would need to change to:

t.method(0, new Object[]{"a", "b"});

or

t.method(0, new String[]{"a", "b"});

since arrays allow for polymorphism. Conversely, if your method uses varargs, passing an array will work just fine. So you see, there's no inconsistency about the main method. Either String[] or String... works because the problems you're seeing deal with how the method is called, not how it's defined.

Update: Since you seem to be looking for the nitty gritty, the JVMS on 5.2 Virtual Machine Start-Up says

A Java virtual machine starts execution by invoking the method main of some specified class, passing it a single argument, which is an array of strings.

and on 8.4.1 Formal Parameters, it says

If the last formal parameter is a variable arity parameter of type T, it is considered to define a formal parameter of type T[]. The method is then a variable arity method. Otherwise, it is a fixed arity method. Invocations of a variable arity method may contain more actual argument expressions than formal parameters. All the actual argument expressions that do not correspond to the formal parameters preceding the variable arity parameter will be evaluated and the results stored into an array that will be passed to the method invocation.

Therefore the main method is always passed a String[] when invoked on application startup, and a varargs argument is always received by the respective method as an array, so there's no inconsistency anywhere.

share|improve this answer
1  
@broiyan: Updated. If you wanted that, you could've asked for it in the first place. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 23 '11 at 4:13
    
It is always a String[] and yet main(String... args) works. I guess that is the real inconsistency. (The original inconsistency has been resolved thanks to the efforts of the people who answered.) –  broiyan Oct 23 '11 at 4:31
    
Read the second quote carefully. String... is equivalent to String[] for all intents and purposes except that String... allows some syntactic sugar in the source code. No inconsistencies. –  Ryan Stewart Oct 23 '11 at 4:33
    
Just to be clear: I consider the original concern about consistency resolved as follows. If you are going to use variable argument lists, use dot dot dot. If you are going to use an array, then use an array in the call and in the declaration. –  broiyan Oct 23 '11 at 4:43
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The short and only correct answer is that you can use either.

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I think you mean you can use either in main() with no changes to the operating system. You can use either for other methods as long as you do not expect any "artificial assistance". –  broiyan Oct 23 '11 at 4:51
    
@broiyan That's not only what I mean, it's exactly what I said actually, without the irrelevant digression about the operating system having nothing to do with it, which is implicit in the fact that I didn't mention it. Your statement about 'artificial assistance' is completely wrong. If you use ... you can use varargs or an array at the calling site, which is what I would call 'artificial assistance'. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 5:27
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String[] represents an array of Strings. It's not enough to have a single string, because you might want to run your programs with more parameters. The so called "inconsistency" is normal for Object Oriented technologies. Two objects from separate classes might behave differently. Only a beginner calls this "inconsistency". Read about the Object Oriented Paradigm and you'll be able to find the answer yourself.

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2  
String... is not a single String. For all practical purposes it behaves the same as String[]. The real reason it's not used in main() is that main() predates the introduction of vararg support in Java by a good long while, as trinithis notes. –  aroth Oct 23 '11 at 1:35
    
The issue has nothing to do with OOP whatsoever. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 4:17
    
@aroth You can indeed declare public static void main(String...args). –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 4:24
    
@EJP - Yes, that is true. Although most IDE's (and certianly Eclipse) will still auto-generate code using public static void main(String[] args), and prior to Java5 only the String[] variant was supported. –  aroth Oct 23 '11 at 5:26
    
@aroth your statement that it isn't used in 'main()' remains incorrect. –  EJP Oct 23 '11 at 5:28
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