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I'm currently trying to use the YouTube API as part of a jQuery plugin and I've run into a bit of a problem.

The way the YT api works is that you load the flash player and, when it's ready it will send a call back to a global function called onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId). You can then use that id combined with getElementById(playerId) to send javascript calls into the flash player (ie, player.playVideo();).

You can attach an event listener to the player with player.addEventListener('onStateChange', 'playerState'); which will send any state changes to another global function (in this case playerState).

The problem is I'm not sure how to associate a state change with a specific player. My jQuery plugin can happily attach more than one video to a selector and attach events to each one, but the moment a state actually changes I lose track of which player it happened in.

I'm hoping some example code may make things a little clearer. The below code should work fine in any html file.

<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="application/text+html;utf-8"/>

  <title>Sandbox</title>

  <link type="text/css" href="http://jqueryui.com/latest/themes/base/ui.all.css" rel="stylesheet" />
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://www.google.com/jsapi"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    google.load("jquery", "1.3.2");
    google.load("jqueryui", "1.7.0");
</script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://swfobject.googlecode.com/svn/tags/rc3/swfobject/src/swfobject.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
(function($) {
    $.fn.simplified = function() {
    	return this.each(function(i) {
    		var params = { allowScriptAccess: "always" };
    		var atts = { id: "ytplayer"+i };
    		$div = $('<div />').attr('id', "containerplayer"+i);
    		swfobject.embedSWF("http://www.youtube.com/v/QTQfGd3G6dg&enablejsapi=1&playerapiid=ytplayer"+i, 
    						   "containerplayer"+i, "425", "356", "8", null, null, params, atts);
    		$(this).append($div);
    	});
    }
})(jQuery);
function onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {
    var player = $('#'+playerId)[0];
    player.addEventListener('onStateChange', 'playerState');
}
function playerState(state) {
    console.log(state);
}

$(document).ready(function() {
    $('.secondary').simplified();
});
</script>
</head>
<body>
    <div id="container">
    	<div class="secondary">

        </div>
    	<div class="secondary">

        </div>
    	<div class="secondary">

        </div>
    	<div class="secondary">

        </div>

    </div>
</body>

</html>

You'll see the console.log() outputtin information on the state changes, but, like I said, I don't know how to tell which player it's associated with.

Anyone have any thoughts on a way around this?

EDIT: Sorry, I should also mentioned that I have tried wrapping the event call in a closure.

function onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {
    var player = $('#'+playerId)[0];
    player.addEventListener('onStateChange', function(state) { 
    return playerState(state, playerId, player); } );
}

function playerState(state, playerId, player) {
    console.log(state);
    console.log(playerId);
}

In this situation playerState never gets called. Which is extra frustrating.

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5 Answers

up vote 23 down vote accepted

Edit:

Apparently calling addEventListener on the player object causes the script to be used as a string in an XML property that's passed to the flash object - this rules out closures and the like, so it's time for an old-school ugly hack:

function onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {
    var player = $('#'+playerId)[0];

    player.addEventListener('onStateChange', '(function(state) { return playerState(state, "' + playerId + '"); })' );
}

function playerState(state, playerId) {
    console.log(state);
    console.log(playerId);
}

Tested & working!

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That was my first thought too, but it doesn't actually work here. playerState doesn't seem to ever get called. –  Steerpike Apr 24 '09 at 15:50
    
I've tested your code as-posted and onYouTubePlayerReady is never called –  Greg Apr 24 '09 at 16:08
    
The videos play OK though –  Greg Apr 24 '09 at 16:08
    
You sure you got all the code? I just re-tested it and I get four 5's outputted to my console.log when the videos load. Are the videos actually appearing for you? –  Steerpike Apr 24 '09 at 16:12
2  
Ah apparently it only works if you access it through a web server. It looks like addEventListener only is only accepting a string - I'm not sure why though... –  Greg Apr 24 '09 at 16:22
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Im Using Jquery SWFobject plugin, SWFobject

It is important to add &enablejsapi=1 at the end of video

HTML:

<div id="embedSWF"></div>

Jquery:

             $('#embedSWF').flash({ 
                swf: 'http://www.youtube.com/watch/v/siBoLc9vxac',
                params: { allowScriptAccess: "always"},   
                flashvars: {enablejsapi: '1', autoplay: '0', allowScriptAccess: "always", id: 'ytPlayer' },   
                height: 450,   width: 385 });

function onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {
                $('#embedSWF').flash(function(){this.addEventListener("onStateChange", "onPlayerStateChange")});
            }
function onPlayerStateChange(newState) {
                   alert(newState);
                 }

onYouTubePlayerReady must be outside of $(document).ready(function() to get fired

share|improve this answer
    
Good call on the plugin! –  Grant Apr 30 '11 at 8:37
1  
"onYouTubePlayerReady must be outside of $(document).ready(function() to get fired" -- you saved my life –  Mustafa Aug 12 '11 at 20:45
3  
One small note: the onYouTubePlayerReady() function code can be within the $(document).ready, but it must be scoped to the window/global object outside of jQuery, so the function would instead need to be defined as such: window.onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {} –  TimKlimowicz Mar 30 '12 at 18:30
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I had this same problem and tried the accepted answer. This didn't work for me; the playerState() function was never called. However, it put me on the right path. What I ended up doing was this:

// Within my mediaController "class"
window["dynamicYouTubeEventHandler" + playerID] = function(state) { onYouTubePlayerStateChange(state, playerID); }
  embedElement.addEventListener("onStateChange", "dynamicYouTubeEventHandler" + playerID);
// End mediaController class

// Global YouTube event handler
function onYouTubePlayerStateChange(state, playerID) {
  var mediaController = GetMediaControllerFromYouTubeEmbedID(playerID);
  mediaController.OnYouTubePlayerStateChange(state);
}

It's fairly nasty, but so is the current state of the YouTube JavaScript API.


Here is some other helpful/nasty code if you are using any kind of advanced prototyping patterns. This basically allows you to retrieve a "class" instance from the YouTube player ID:

// Within my mediaController "class"
// The containerJQElement is the jQuery wrapped parent element of the player ID
// Its ID is the same as the player ID minus "YouTubeEmbed".
var _self = this;
containerJQElement.data('mediaController', _self);
// End mediaController class

// Global YouTube specific functions
function GetMediaControllerFromYouTubeEmbedID(embedID) {      
  var containerID = embedID.replace('YouTubeEmbed', '');
  var containerJQObject = $("#" + containerID);
  return containerJQObject.data('mediaController');      
}

function onYouTubePlayerReady(playerId) {
  var mediaController = GetMediaControllerFromYouTubeEmbedID(playerId);
  mediaController.OnYouTubeAPIReady();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This was not very clear to me. Where do I get a mediaController "class"? –  Volomike Jan 24 '12 at 0:53
    
@Volomike it's just a self-defined JavaScript object used to help control the YouTube element. –  JoshNaro Jan 24 '12 at 18:57
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Here's a nice article that goes through creating a class to wrap an individual player, including dispatching events to individual objects using a similar approach to that mentioned in a previous answer.

http://blog.jcoglan.com/2008/05/22/dispatching-youtube-api-events-to-individual-javascript-objects/

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How about something like so:

var closureFaker = function (func, scope) {
    var functionName = 'closureFake_' + (((1+Math.random())*0x10000000)|0).toString(16);
    window[functionName] = function () {
        func.apply(scope || window, arguments);
    };
    console.log('created function:', functionName, window[functionName]);
    return functionName;
};

ytplayer.addEventListener("onStateChange", closureFaker(function () {
    //place your logic here
    console.log('state change', arguments)
}));
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