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Why is a C++ bool var true by default?

Say I were to do something like this:

class blah
{
  public:
  bool exampleVar;
};

blah exampleArray[4];
exampleArray[1].exampleVar = true;

In exampleArray, there are now 3 unset instances of exampleVar, what are their default values without me setting them?

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marked as duplicate by dmckee, Matthieu M., balexandre, Flexo, cHao Oct 25 '11 at 11:16

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
No surprise that the earlier version did not come up in search, and this one has a better title, but the answer is the same. If automatic or allocated with new or malloc bools have no default value. You just get what is in memory. static or global variable are initialized to 0 == false. –  dmckee Oct 23 '11 at 2:30

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

The default value depends on the scope that exampleArray is declared in. If it is local to a function the values will be random, whatever values those stack locations happened to be at. If it is static or declared at file scope (global) the values will be zero initialized.

Here's a demonstration. If you need a member variable to have a deterministic value always initialize it in the constructor.

class blah
{
  public:
  blah() 
  : exampleVar(false)
  {}

  bool exampleVar;
};

EDIT:
The constructor in the above example is no longer necessary with C++11. Data members can be initialized within the class declaration itself.

class blah
{
  public:
  bool exampleVar = false;
};

This inline default value can be overridden by a user-defined constructor if desired.

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+1 for catching the subtle difference. –  Loki Astari Oct 23 '11 at 2:49
    
You may also want to note that you can use zero-initialization to make sure that the values are initialized when the class is not yours and thus you can't add a constructor. –  Loki Astari Oct 23 '11 at 2:58
    
+1: Very interesting. You answered my question and more. :D –  Lemmons Oct 23 '11 at 4:09
    
Strictly speaking, it depends on the object's storage duration (lifetime), not its scope. For example, if you define static bool b; inside a function, b has static storage duration (and is therefore zero-initialized) but block scope. (An object defined at file scope can only have static storage duration.) Also, the initial value isn't strictly random, it's arbitrary -- which means you shouldn't be surprised if it happens to be false 99 times out of 100. –  Keith Thompson Apr 24 '13 at 21:27

Their default values are undefined. You shouldn't depend on them being set as one thing or another and is often called "garbage".

Depending on your compiler, it may be set to false. But even then, you are better off setting them.

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I'm not sure its undefined. the compiler should call the constructor of every field in the class, and the constructor for bool might set it to false. –  Dani Oct 23 '11 at 2:29
1  
Worse, your compiler may initialize memory when you are doing debug builds, but not release builds. –  ObscureRobot Oct 23 '11 at 2:30
    
@Dani in the example given above, there is no constructor, and exampleVar is not set. –  ObscureRobot Oct 23 '11 at 2:30
    
@ObscureRobot: when there is no constructor c++ offers its default constructor which calls all the constructors of the members –  Dani Oct 23 '11 at 2:34
5  
@Dani Only default constructors of user defined types are called, not primitive types –  Praetorian Oct 23 '11 at 2:35

The default value is indeterminate. Possibly different every time you run your program. You should initialize the value to something or have another variable indicating that your private members are not initialized.

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It is better to call it undefined than random. –  ObscureRobot Oct 23 '11 at 2:37
    
@ObscureRobot - Or indeterminate to be more precise. –  Brian Roach Oct 23 '11 at 2:40
    
@above Thanks for correction of wording :) –  FailedDev Oct 23 '11 at 2:43

@Praetorian: Covered the main points in his answer.

But it is also worth noting.

blah exampleArray[4];         // static storage duration will be zero-initialized 
                              // ie POD member exampleVar will be false.

void foo()
{
    blah exampleArray1[4];    // automatic storage duration will be untouched.
                              // Though this is a class type it only has a compiler 
                              // generated constructor. When it is called this way 
                              // it performs default-construction and POD members
                              // have indeterminate values


    blah exampleArray2[4] = {};  // Can force zero-in initialization;
                                 // This is list-initialization.
                                 // This forces value-initialization of each member.
                                 // If this is a class with a compiler generated constrcutor
                                 // Then each member is zero-initialized


    // following through to non array types.
    blah       tmp1;            // Default initialized: Member is indeterminate
    blah       tmp2 = blah();   // Zero Initialized: Members is false

    // Unfortunately does not work as expected
    blah       tmp3();          // Most beginners think this is zero initialization.
                                // Unfortunately it is a forward function declaration.
                                // You must use tmp2 version to get the zero-initialization 
}
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Unassigned default values are undefined in C/C++. If you need a specific value, then create a constructor for class blah and set your default value.

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Indeterminate.

Non-static member variables need to be initialized unless you can guarantee the first operation performed on them will be a write. The most common way would be via the constructor. Use an initialization list if you still want a no-arg / no-op constructor:

public:
blah() : exampleVar(false) {}
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struct x
{
    bool b;

    x() : b() { }
}

...
x myx;

in this case, myx.b will be false.

struct x
{
    bool b;
}

...
x myx;

in this case, myx.b will be unpredictable, it will be the value that location of memory had before allocating myx.

Since in C and C++, a false value is defined as 0 and a true value is defined as non zero, there is a bigger possibility that a random address location will contain a true value instead of a false value. Usually, in C++, sizeof(bool) is 1, it means, 8 bit. There are 1 over 255 possibilities that a random location of memory is false, and this explain why you perceived the default boolean value as true.

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