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I'm trying to implement the node.js module.exports and exports rule in a script. These 2 variables should be equal to each other at all times. Even when one changes the other one should change too.

I tried doing this with setters, but both o.foo and o.bar end up undefined =/

var foo = { hello: 'world' };
var o = {
  foo: foo,
  bar: foo
};


var inuse = false;
var setter = function(val) {
  if (inuse) return;
  inuse = true;
  o.foo = val;
  o.bar = val;
  inuse = false;
};
o.__defineSetter__('foo', setter);
o.__defineSetter__('bar', setter);

o.foo = { hey: 'there' };

console.log(o.foo);
console.log(o.bar);
share|improve this question
3  
I don't get it. If they both must be "the same at all times", then why do you need two unique variables at all? Just use one. –  Sparky Oct 23 '11 at 2:46
    
I was wondering the same thing. But I'm trying to emulate loading a module in a vm so I need to do this because it's the way node.js modules currently work. –  DeaDEnD Oct 23 '11 at 3:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Create getters as well, and assign to different property names.

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/jqExh/

var foo = { hello: 'world' };
var o = {
  _foo: foo,
  _bar: foo
};

var inuse = false;

var setter = function(val) {
  if (inuse) return;
  inuse = true;
  this._foo = val;
  this._bar = val;
  inuse = false;
};
o.__defineGetter__('foo',function(){return this._foo;});
o.__defineGetter__('bar',function(){return this._bar;});
o.__defineSetter__('foo', setter);
o.__defineSetter__('bar', setter);

o.foo = { hey: 'there' };

console.log( o.foo ); // Object
console.log( o.bar ); // Object

console.log( o.foo === o.bar ); // true

console.log( o.foo.hey, o.bar.hey ); // there there

Or use variables instead of properties:

DEMO: http://jsfiddle.net/jqExh/1/

var o = (function() {
    var foo = { hello: 'world' };

    var _foo = foo;
    var _bar = foo;

    var _o = {};

    var inuse = false;

    var setter = function(val) {
      if (inuse) return;
      inuse = true;
      _foo = val;
      _bar = val;
      inuse = false;
    };
    _o.__defineGetter__('foo',function(){return _foo;});
    _o.__defineGetter__('bar',function(){return _bar;});
    _o.__defineSetter__('foo', setter);
    _o.__defineSetter__('bar', setter);

    return _o;
})();

o.foo = { hey: 'there' };

console.log( o.foo );
console.log( o.bar );

console.log( o.foo === o.bar ); // true

console.log( o.foo.hey, o.bar.hey ); // there there

This way the only way to get and set them is via the accessors.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. very nice. –  DeaDEnD Oct 23 '11 at 3:18
    
Be aware that this doesn't work in all browsers. –  jfriend00 Oct 23 '11 at 4:32
    
-1 for using deprecated non standard __defineGetter__ use Object.defineProperty instead. –  Raynos Oct 24 '11 at 10:31

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