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What I'm doing now:

void Main()
{
    var command1 = new PersistenceCommand(new MyIntBO());
    var command2 = new PersistenceCommand(new MyGuidBO());
    var command3 = new PersistenceCommand(new PersistentBO());

    Console.WriteLine(command1.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine(command2.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine(command3.ToString());
}

public class PersistenceCommand
{
    public PersistenceCommand(PersistentBO businessObject)
    {
        _businessObject = businessObject;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        string result = _businessObject.GetType().Name;

        var keyed = _businessObject as IPrimaryKeyed<int>;

        if (keyed != null)
        {
            result += " " + keyed.Id.ToString();
        }

        return result;
    }

    private readonly PersistentBO _businessObject;
}

public interface IPrimaryKeyed<out TKey>
{
    TKey Id { get; }
}

public class PersistentBO {}

public class MyIntBO : PersistentBO, IPrimaryKeyed<int>
{
    public int Id { get { return 1008; } }
}

public class MyGuidBO : PersistentBO, IPrimaryKeyed<Guid>
{
    public Guid Id
    {
        get
        {
            return new Guid("6135d49b-81bb-43d4-9b74-dd84c2d3cc29");
        }
    }
}

This prints:

MyIntBO 1008
MyGuidBO
PersistentBO

I'd like it to print:

MyIntBO 1008
MyGuidBO 6135d49b-81bb-43d4-9b74-dd84c2d3cc29
PersistentBO

What's the most elegant way to do that?

I want to support all types of keys - int, long, Guid, etc. - so I'd rather not do multiple casts. Note that not every business object implements that interface (some do not have a single primary key).

I realize I could use reflection and try to access the Id property. I was wondering if there's a better solution.

Clarification: To address @Acaz Souza and @Petar Ivanov's answers, we have dozens of classes scattered over multiple assemblies that already implement IPrimaryKeyed<T>. I do not want to break all of them by extending the interface contract. If I were designing this from scratch, their solutions would work.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Using reflection doesn't seem like a bad way to go here.

ToString method:

// for getting the Id prop
var identProp = _businessObject.GetType().GetProperty("Id");
string result = _businessObject.GetType().Name;

if (identProp != null)
{
    result += " " + identProp.GetValue(_businessObject, null).ToString();
}  
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - saves me some time if I go that route. Note that stuff should be _businessObject. I could cache the result of GetType() too. –  TrueWill Oct 23 '11 at 18:16
    
good catch on the typo, fixed –  Gary.S Oct 23 '11 at 18:19
    
This was what I ended up using. I added a check for CanRead and one that the result of GetValue was not null. –  TrueWill Oct 24 '11 at 17:25

Just create a non-generic interface and replace the generic one with generic abstract class. Then check for the interface:

    public interface IPrimaryKeyed
    {
        object ObjId { get; }
    }

    public abstract class PrimaryKeyed<TKey> : IPrimaryKeyed
    {
        public object ObjId { get { return Id; } }
        public abstract TKey Id { get; }
    }

---

public override string ToString()
{
    string result = _businessObject.GetType().Name;

    var keyed = _businessObject as IPrimaryKeyed;

    if (keyed != null)
    {
        result += " " + keyed.ObjId.ToString();
    }

    return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a very elegant solution, which would be workable if we had designed it that way from the start. Please see my clarification above for why this is not optimal for my situation. My apologies for not including that with my original post. –  TrueWill Oct 23 '11 at 18:01
    
Incidentally, I can't use an abstract class as I already have a required base class and C# is single-inheritance. I'd have to use public interface IPrimaryKeyed<out TKey> : IPrimaryKeyed and implement the property on every business object. They're generated code, so it's doable, but it would be a pain. –  TrueWill Oct 23 '11 at 18:09

The problem is in that line:

var keyed = _businessObject as IPrimaryKeyed<int>;

Your other type is not IPrimaryKeyed<int> is IPrimaryKeyed<Guid>, then the if (keyed != null) is false.

You can try do this:

static void Main()
{
    var command1 = new PersistenceCommand(new MyIntBO());
    var command2 = new PersistenceCommand(new MyGuidBO());
    var command3 = new PersistenceCommand(new PersistentBO());

    Console.WriteLine(command1.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine(command2.ToString());
    Console.WriteLine(command3.ToString());
    Console.ReadLine();
}

public class PersistenceCommand
{
    public PersistenceCommand(PersistentBO businessObject)
    {
        _businessObject = businessObject;
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        string result = _businessObject.GetType().Name;

        var keyed = _businessObject as IPrimaryKeyed;

        if (keyed != null)
        {
            result += " " + keyed.Id.ToString();
        }

        return result;
    }

    private readonly PersistentBO _businessObject;
}

public interface IPrimaryKeyed
{
    object Id { get; }
}

public class PersistentBO { }

public class MyIntBO : PersistentBO, IPrimaryKeyed
{
    public object Id { get { return 1008; } }
}

public class MyGuidBO : PersistentBO, IPrimaryKeyed
{
    public object Id { get { return new Guid("6135d49b-81bb-43d4-9b74-dd84c2d3cc29"); } }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I'm aware of where the problem lies. Please see my clarification of the answer. Also note that the existing interface is used in other places; I don't want to simply remove the generic. @Petar Ivanov's similar solution would be workable if it weren't for my constraints. +1, though. –  TrueWill Oct 23 '11 at 17:59

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