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I have a script running on the background of my linux server and I would like to catch signals like reboot or anything that would kill this script and instead save any importante information before actually exiting.

I think most of what I need to catch is, SIGINT, SIGTERM, SIGHUP, SIGKILL.

How do catch any of these signals and have it execute an exit function otherwise keep executing whatever it was doing ?

pseudo perl code:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use stricts;
use warnings;

while (true)
{
    #my happy code is running
    #my happy code will sleep for a few until its breath is back to keep running.
}

#ops I have detected an evil force trying to kill me
#let's call the safe exit.
sub safe_exit() 
{
    # save stuff
    exit(1);
}

pseudo php code:

<?php

while (1)
{
    #my happy code is running
    #my happy code will sleep for a few until its breath is back to keep running.
}

#ops I have detected an evil force trying to kill me
#let's call the safe exit.

function safe_exit()
{
    # save stuff
    exit(1);
}
?>
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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

PHP uses pcntl_signal to register a signal handler, so something like this:

declare(ticks = 1);

function sig_handler($sig) {
    switch($sig) {
        case SIGINT:
        # one branch for signal...
    }
}

pcntl_signal(SIGINT,  "sig_handler");
pcntl_signal(SIGTERM, "sig_handler");
pcntl_signal(SIGHUP,  "sig_handler");
# Nothing for SIGKILL as it won't work and trying to will give you a warning.
share|improve this answer
    
will try it out thanks ... so basicly it would be assigned to the handler and catched even if I have an infinite while running somewhere in the code right ? –  Prix Oct 23 '11 at 5:06
    
@Prix: Yes, that should happen. But pay attention to ikegami's notes on SIGKILL and read the docs (php.net/manual/en/function.pcntl-signal.php) for more information. –  mu is too short Oct 23 '11 at 5:11
    
# Just for show, you won't catch this. not only that but you still get a warning message about it when running the code. Rest works pretty well thanks. –  Prix Oct 23 '11 at 5:24
    
@Prix: I wasn't aware of the warning message but I'm quite pleased to hear that it is there. I'll adjust that bit. –  mu is too short Oct 23 '11 at 5:26
    
While I liked a lot the solution in Perl I was actually aiming to do this in PHP but wanted to know how it would be in both scenarios and you were of great help with the links and everything thanks a lot ;), also loved the kill -l was not aware of it. –  Prix Oct 23 '11 at 5:29

Perl:

@SIG{qw( INT TERM HUP )} = \&safe_exit;

SIGKILL cannot be caught. It is not sent to the process.

%SIG is documented in perlvar. See also perlipc

share|improve this answer
    
Seems good but does kill -9 pid falls into INT or SIGKILL ? I mainly use kill -HUP to finish the process and from what I know the reboot sends a TERM signal but would like to be safe against anyone else trying to kill it. –  Prix Oct 23 '11 at 5:07
3  
@Prix: 9 is SIGKILL. Try kill -l if you're using bash, that will give you a list of signals along with their numbers. Ctrl+C is SIGINT. –  mu is too short Oct 23 '11 at 5:10

For the perl version, see perldoc -q signal -- basically, set $SIG{signal} to a sub reference.

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1  
perldoc perlvar would be another good reference: perldoc.perl.org/perlvar.html#%25SIG –  mu is too short Oct 23 '11 at 4:50
    
Oh, right. I totally brainfarted on that. –  Jim Davis Oct 23 '11 at 5:10
    
The perldoc -q signal does not tell me enouch to know how enumerated the options are to be used and as such your reply doesnt help me much but thanks anyway. @mu is too short The reference link you posted is great, does show all of what the above did not. –  Prix Oct 23 '11 at 5:10

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