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I keep on getting initialization errors in this code on the use strict and can't figure out why. I set the scope right for all the variables - and the codes runs. Just don't understand the ugly errors.

2/15/2002   Joe   155
2/15/2002   Mike  108
2/15/2002   Pete  209
2/22/2002   Joe   158
2/22/2002   Mike  99
2/22/2002   Pete  163
3/1/2002    Joe   172
3/1/2002    Mike  125
#!/usr/bin/perl -w
our %dates;
foreach my $line (<>) {
    chomp $line;
    my ($this_date, $this_name, $this_score) = split /\s+/, $line;
    my ($record_name, $record_score) = split /\|/, $dates{$this_date};
    if ($this_name && $this_score) {
            if ($this_score > $record_score) {
                    $dates{$this_date} = join "|", ($this_name, $this_score);
            }
    }
}

foreach my $date (keys %dates) {
    my ($name, $score ) = split /\|/, $dates{$date};
    print " The high_scored for $date was $name with $score\n";
shortcasper@shortcasper-laptop:~/perl$ ./hash_bowl bowl_linux
Use of uninitialized value in split at ./hash_bowl line 8,  line 7.
Use of uninitialized value $record_score in numeric gt (>) at ./hash_bowl line 10,    line 7.
Use of uninitialized value in split at ./hash_bowl line 8,  line 7.
Use of uninitialized value $record_score in numeric gt (>) at ./hash_bowl line 10,    line 7.
The high_scored for 3/1/2002 was Joe with 172
The high_scored for 2/15/2002 was Pete with 209
shortcasper@shortcasper-laptop:~/perl$
share|improve this question
    
Where does $dates get its values from? – Gabe Oct 23 '11 at 5:08
    
Something doesn't look right... %dates doesn't get values until $this_score > $record_score yet $record_score is the output from a split against values in %dates. – Gibron Kury Oct 23 '11 at 5:11
    
%dates records the highest score seen on previous lines. Naturally, it doesn't have a value the first time a particular date is seen, and that undef is what causes the warnings. – cjm Oct 23 '11 at 16:46
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You should use warnings instead of using -w.

The reason it complains is that the first time you encounter a particular day, $dates{$this_date} is undef (because it's never been set). Splitting that gives you a warning and makes $record_name and $record_score undef (causing your second warning when you compare $this_score to $record_score). The code works because numerically, undef is considered 0, but it generates warnings.

A simple fix is to use $dates{$this_date} || '|0' instead. This provides a default value for new dates, setting $record_name to the empty string and $record_score to 0:

use strict;
use warnings;

our %dates;
foreach my $line (<DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    my ($this_date, $this_name, $this_score) = split /\s+/, $line;
    my ($record_name, $record_score) = split /\|/, $dates{$this_date} || '|0';
    if ($this_name && $this_score) {
            if ($this_score > $record_score) {
                    $dates{$this_date} = join "|", ($this_name, $this_score);
            }
    }
}

foreach my $date (keys %dates) {
    my ($name, $score ) = split /\|/, $dates{$date};
    print " The high_scored for $date was $name with $score\n";
}

__DATA__
2/15/2002   Joe   155
2/15/2002   Mike  108
2/15/2002   Pete  209
2/22/2002   Joe   158
2/22/2002   Mike  99
2/22/2002   Pete  163
3/1/2002    Joe   172
3/1/2002    Mike  125

But you should read the Perl Data Structures Cookbook and consider using a complex data structure instead of having to join and split your data just to store it in a hash.

share|improve this answer
    
This works - however I don't know why, to my neophyte understanding || '|0' looks like a 'or pipe in a 0'. I tried setting the used values to '0' before the code execution (but that did not work). this gives me some food for thought. i'll figure this our eventually. – capser Oct 23 '11 at 14:01
    
Your split expects to see NAME|SCORE, and it complains when it gets undef instead. $dates{$this_date} || '|0' means "use $dates{$this_date}, or if that's false (meaning undef, because no string containing a | character is false) use the string '|0' (meaning blank name, 0 score). – cjm Oct 23 '11 at 16:42

It seems to me that your hash %dates is initialized but its values are not. Your code tries to use the value of $dates{$this_date} before it is actually set (which happens a few lines later).

share|improve this answer
    
I tried setting $this_date to zero, but I still gets the same errors. thanks for the edit. – capser Oct 23 '11 at 13:54

%dates is a empty hash. So $dates{$this_date} is becoming "undef"

Change your inner condition like below to make it work; when there is no old records, it will insert in the dates hash.

 if ( !(defined  $record_score) || $this_score > $record_score) {
                $dates{$this_date} = join "|", ($this_name, $this_score);
        }
share|improve this answer
    
This looks like the most concise answer, but spits out an error. Global symbol "$record_store" requires explicit package name at ./hash_bowl line 10. Execution of ./hash_bowl aborted due to compilation errors. – capser Oct 23 '11 at 13:42
    
when i set the record store to our and give it a value of 0 - Use of uninitialized value in split at ./hash_bowl line 11, <> line 7. Use of uninitialized value in split at ./hash_bowl line 11, <> line 7. – capser Oct 23 '11 at 14:05

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