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I'm writing a C++ wrapper around a C library and, as such, need to use getter/setter methods to call the original C functions.

class View {
public:

    GR_COLOR getBackgroundColor();
    void setBackgroundColor(GR_COLOR color);

    GR_COLOR getBorderColor();
    void setBorderColor(GR_COLOR color);
};

Is it considered bad to mix this style with normal variables, like this?

class View {
public:

    GR_COLOR getBackgroundColor();
    void setBackgroundColor(GR_COLOR color);

    GR_COLOR getBorderColor();
    void setBorderColor(GR_COLOR color);

    int someOtherVariable;
};
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you define getters and setters for all of your variables, and make the variables private, future changes to your code would be much easier. This is one of the principles behind getters/setters in OOP. People wouldn't have direct access to your members, and you don't have to worry about how they use it because YOU control how they will be used via getters and setters.

It would also be consistent with the rest of your library.

Ultimately, however, it's up to you. If I were you, I'd definitely use getters and setters.

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It is not considered bad style to have getters and setters for some variables and not for others. But adding getters and setters and then making your variables private for your other variables will protect the users of your class from future changes to the internals of your class.

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I would consider it somewhat bad style. Why not make all your variables private and have public getters/setters for each? It is more verbose, but it is (I think) more in keeping with OOP style.

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I personally don't see it as being bad at all. However, when I see something like that I usually think that the setters provide more processing and functionality than just setting the value of a variable. ie. perhaps setBorderColor will set the variable holding the colour and update the UI, while a public variable, say updateDelay for use in a timer for updating some dynamic thing on the UI (I don't know can't think of anything on the spot), doesn't need any extra processing.

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