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I am trying to plot the CDF curve for a large dataset containing about 29 million values using ggplot. The way I am computing this is like this:

mycounts = ddply(idata.frame(newdata), .(Type), transform, ecd = ecdf(Value)(Value))
plot = ggplot(mycounts, aes(x=Value, y=ecd))

This is taking ages to plot. I was wondering if there is a clean way to plot only a sample of this dataset (say, every 10th point or 50th point) without compromising on the actual result?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I am not sure about your data structure, but a simple sample call might be enough:

n <- nrow(mycounts)                              # number of cases in data frame
mycounts <- mycounts[sample(n, round(n/10)), ]   # get an n/10 sample to the same data frame
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+1 Thank you. This works perfect! –  Legend Oct 23 '11 at 9:16

Instead of taking every n-th point, can you quantize your data set down to a sufficient resolution before plotting it? That way, you won't have to plot resolution you don't need (or can't see).

Here's one way you can do it. (The function I've written below is generic, but the example uses names from your question.)

library(ggplot2)
library(plyr)

## A data set containing two ramps up to 100, one by 1, one by 10

tens <- data.frame(Type = factor(c(rep(10, 10), rep(1, 100))),
                   Value = c(1:10 * 10, 1:100))


## Given a data frame and ddply-style arguments, partition the frame
## using ddply and summarize the values in each partition with a
## quantized ecdf.  The resulting data frame for each partition has
## two columns: value and value_ecdf.

dd_ecdf <- function(df, ..., .quantizer = identity, .value = value) {
  value_colname <- deparse(substitute(.value))
  ddply(df, ..., .fun = function(rdf) {
    xs <- rdf[[value_colname]]
    qxs <- sort(unique(.quantizer(xs)))
    data.frame(value = qxs, value_ecdf = ecdf(xs)(qxs))
  })
}


## Plot each type's ECDF (w/o quantization)

tens_cdf <- dd_ecdf(tens, .(Type), .value = Value)
qplot(value, value_ecdf, color = Type, geom = "step", data = tens_cdf)



## Plot each type's ECDF (quantizing to nearest 25)

rounder <- function(...) function(x) round_any(x, ...)
tens_cdfq <- dd_ecdf(tens, .(Type), .value = Value, .quantizer = rounder(25))
qplot(value, value_ecdf, color = Type, geom = "step", data = tens_cdfq)

While the original data set and the ecdf set had 110 rows, the quantized-ecdf set is much reduced:

> dim(tens)
[1] 110   2
> dim(tens_cdf)
[1] 110   3
> dim(tens_cdfq)
[1] 10  3
> tens_cdfq
   Type value value_ecdf
1     1     0       0.00
2     1    25       0.25
3     1    50       0.50
4     1    75       0.75
5     1   100       1.00
6    10     0       0.00
7    10    25       0.20
8    10    50       0.50
9    10    75       0.70
10   10   100       1.00

I hope this helps! :-)

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