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All, quick and easy one here...

I'm writing an Evaluate function that runs through a bunch of other bool functions. Right now, I'm basically doing an if, else if loop (seen below). Any suggestions on another way of doing this??? I'm assuming I could do this with a switch but have never used them before like this.

int i = 78;

if (isPrime(i))
{
     cout <<"is prime" << endl;
     return;
}

else if (ismultipleOf23(i))
{
    cout <<"is a multiple of 23" << endl;
    return;
}

else if (isEven(i))
{
    cout <<"is Even" << endl;
    return;
}

else if (isOdd(i))
{
    cout <<"is Odd" << endl;
    return;
}
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Why you want to change it? –  Alok Save Oct 23 '11 at 14:57
1  
This is the best way to do it. No, you cannot conveniently use switch here. && and || are sometimes good for concision but if you are going to have side-effects, it would be poor style to use them. –  Pascal Cuoq Oct 23 '11 at 14:58
    
23 is a prime and prime numbers are a subset of odd numbers. A multiple of 23 could be even or odd. If/else doesn't really work here. –  Pubby Oct 23 '11 at 15:33

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can't use a switch because the labels have to be constant.

What you are doing is the correct way.

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What if they were C++11 constexpr? –  Pubby Oct 23 '11 at 15:28
    
@Pubby8, don't know C++11, can't comment on that. –  Winston Ewert Oct 23 '11 at 17:29

You can remove all the returns and you don't need to check for odd because if it is not even, it has to be odd.

int i = 78;

if (isPrime(i))
{
   cout <<"is prime" << endl;
}
else if (ismultipleOf23(i))
{
  cout <<"is a multiple of 23" << endl;
}
else if (isEven(i))
{
  cout <<"is Even" << endl;
}
else
{
  cout <<"is Odd" << endl;
}
return;  // This is also optional
share|improve this answer

It is not worth it for so few tests, but if you had many tests you could put them in a list and iterate over them:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
using namespace std;

struct TEST {
    bool (*func)(int);
    string msg;
};

bool isMult23(int i) { return i % 23 == 0; }
bool isEven(int i) { return i % 2 == 0; }
bool isOdd(int i) { return !isEven(i); }
bool isOther(int i) { return true; } // sentinel, always true

TEST test[] = {
    isMult23,"is multiple of 23",
    isEven,"is even",
    isOdd,"is odd",
    isOther,"is something else"
};

string eval(int value)
{
    int i = 0;
    while(!test[i].func(value))
        i++;
    return test[i].msg;
}

int main()
{
    cout << eval(46) << endl;
    cout << eval(78) << endl;
    cout << eval(81) << endl;
    return 0;
}

Output

is multiple of 23
is even
is odd
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You could do some crazy stuff with templates, lambdas, and such that would allow you to easily add new tests and to loop through the set of tests, executing a lambda on success and returning...

But that would be overkill and would require a somewhat standard-compliant compiler (since C++11 is now the standard, I'm comfortable with that statement).

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