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Funcional Programming is very new to me and can't seem to understand how to use a function as an argument for another function. finalvalue is supposed to calculate the final value after a period, and finalvalue2 after 2 periods.

interest :: Float -> Float -> Float
interest capital rate = capital * rate * 0.01

finalvalue :: Float -> Float -> Float
finalvalue capital rate = capital + interest capital rate

finalvalue2 :: Float -> Float -> Float
finalvalue2 capital rate = finalvalue capital rate + interest finalvalue capital rate rate

I get this:

Couldn't match expected type `Float'
       against inferred type `Float -> Float -> Float'
In the first argument of `interest', namely `finalvalue'
In the second argument of `(+)', namely
    `interest finalvalue capital rate rate'
In the expression:
      finalvalue capital rate + interest finalvalue capital rate rate

I'm sure I'm missing a basic point here but I just can't find out what it is.

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1  
Count the number of arguments you declare for interest and the number of arguments you apply to it in finalvalue2. Do you see what's wrong? –  FUZxxl Oct 23 '11 at 15:03
1  
Brackets! Or the $ –  Nick Brunt Oct 23 '11 at 15:03
1  
@Nick: $ won't work here because the function call is not the last argument. –  sepp2k Oct 23 '11 at 15:05
    
Well it would work if he swapped the order of the arguments round in the interest function. But yes, I agree, see my answer. –  Nick Brunt Oct 23 '11 at 15:06

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted
interest finalvalue capital rate rate

Here you're calling interest with four arguments, the first of which is a function. Since interest's first argument needs to be a Float, not a function, you get the error message you do.

What you probably intended to write was interest (finalvalue capital rate) rate, which calls interest with two floats, the first of which is the result of calling finalvalue with capital and rate as arguments.

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Thanks a lot! I didn't know i was supposed to use brackets like that. problem solved. –  1nterference Oct 23 '11 at 15:35

You just need some parentheses, no?

finalvalue2 :: Float -> Float -> Float
finalvalue2 capital rate = 
   finalvalue capital rate + interest (finalvalue capital rate) rate

In

finalvalue2 :: Float -> Float -> Float
finalvalue2 capital rate = 
   finalvalue capital rate + interest finalvalue capital rate rate
                                      ^^^^^^^^^^

the compiler is taking the marked use of finalvalue, by itself, to be the first argument of interest, as if it were 3.23, but of course it can't make sense of that. (It is a good idea to look at the exact position mentioned by the error statement, which in this case points to the place I marked.)

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finalvalue2              :: Float -> Float -> Float
finalvalue2 capital rate = finalvalue capital rate + interest (finalvalue capital rate) rate
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