Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am newbiew regarding pointer, Can anybody explain me the dissimilarity of output in the following code ? In the following code i am assigning some value to a 3d pointer. I printed them after assignment. Then again printed them in different block. How come the output be different ?

#include<stdio.h>
#define row 5
#define rw 3
#define col 10

char ***ptr,sh[10];
int i,j,k;

int main()
{
    ptr=(char *)malloc(row*sizeof(char *));

    for(i=0;i<row;i++)
    {
        *(ptr+i)=(char *)malloc(rw*sizeof(char *));
        printf("\t:\n");

        for(j=0;j<rw;j++)
        {
            *(*(ptr+i)+j)=(char *)malloc(col*sizeof(char *));

            if(i==0 && j==0)
            {       
                //  *(*(ptr+row)+rw)="kabul";
                **ptr="zapac";
            }
            else
            {
                sh[0]=i+48;
                sh[1]=',';
                sh[2]=j+48;
                sh[3]='\0';
                *(*(ptr+i)+j)=sh;
            }

            printf("\t%d%d = %s\n",i,j,ptr[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

    for(i=0;i<row;i++)
    {
        for(j=0;j<rw;j++)
        {
            printf("\t%d%d %s\n",i,j,ptr[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

The output is :

    :
    00 = zapac
    01 = 0,1
    02 = 0,2

    :
    10 = 1,0
    11 = 1,1
    12 = 1,2

    :
    20 = 2,0
    21 = 2,1
    22 = 2,2

    :
    30 = 3,0
    31 = 3,1
    32 = 3,2

    :
    40 = 4,0
    41 = 4,1
    42 = 4,2

My question is, why is the following output disagree with the above ?

    00 zapac
    01 4,2
    02 4,2

    10 4,2
    11 4,2
    12 4,2

    20 4,2
    21 4,2
    22 4,2

    30 4,2
    31 4,2
    32 4,2

    40 4,2
    41 4,2
    42 4,2
share|improve this question
    
ptr is not a pointer to a pointer but pointer to a pointer pointing to another pointer. char ***ptr; ptr=(char *)malloc(row*sizeof(char *)); Are u sure that this statement passed with out any compilation error ? – Mahesh Oct 23 '11 at 16:34
    
Then how should I assign something like, ptr[0][0]="mahesh" ptr[0][1]="maverick" ptr[1][0]="pqrst" with pointer representation ? – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 16:37
    
yes it is... and i just copied the output – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 16:38
3  
warning: assignment from incompatible pointer type at Ideone – Mahesh Oct 23 '11 at 16:40
    
@Mahesh, I am really a newbie regarding pointer. I had a "suspicious pointer conversion" warning. though no error was shown. can you then tell me how should i assign memory and by the process have my expected output ? – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 16:54
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The reason you're getting the output you are is that your *(*(ptr+i)+j) = sh is setting all of the char *s (except the first, which you have treated specially) to the same value, which is the address of the array data in sh. There's only one copy of sh, one copy of its array data; all your char *s point to that single copy. When you print out the values later, you're just printing this same copy of the data over and over again via different pointers to it -- so you get whatever you put in sh the last time you modified it rather than what was in it when you set the pointer.

You probably expected each char * to get a new copy of the array instead of just being pointed at sh, but if that's what you want you have to copy the data yourself.

So... if you replace this line:

*(*(ptr+i)+j)=sh;

with something like:

*(*(ptr+i)+j)=malloc(sizeof(sh));
strcpy( *(*(ptr+i)+j), sh );

or

ptr[i][j] = calloc(1,sizeof(sh));
strcpy( ptr[i][j], sh );

you'll get what you expected, because each char * will point at a new copy of the string that was in sh at the time of the copy. You'll need to remember to free them later, along with everything else you've malloc()ed, though.

Most of your malloc() lines are incorrect as well, but since char *, char **, and char *** are probably all the same size on your system, it works anyway.

ptr=(char *)malloc(row*sizeof(char *));

should be

ptr = (char ***)malloc(row*sizeof(char **));

since you're allocating an array of char ** (pointer to pointer to char), which is accessed through a char *** (pointer to pointer to pointer to char). Likewise:

*(ptr+i)=(char *)malloc(rw*sizeof(char *));

should be

*(ptr+i)=(char **)malloc(rw*sizeof(char *));

or

ptr[i] = (char **)malloc(rw * sizeof(char *));

to allocate an array of char * (pointer to char) accessed via a char ** (pointer to pointer to char).

The casts in front of your malloc() calls are actually optional -- malloc()'s void * result would be converted to whatever pointer type you assigned it to anyway. In this case, though, having the casts there should have made your compiler warn you that you had the types wrong.

share|improve this answer
    
@Dimitri thanks, dmitri... i aint still good enough to vote you up.... i used the cast so that it works on every compiler..... it really helped...:) – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 18:22
    
@Maverick_Mrt: Without the cast, it will work on every C compiler -- at least if you remember the #include <stdlib.h> so the compiler knows what malloc() looks like. – Keith Thompson Oct 23 '11 at 18:56
    
@Keith, I have found that without cast and with stdlib Dev-C++ gives compiler error : invalid conversion – Maverick_Mrt Oct 27 '11 at 1:20
    
@Maverick_Mrt: Then Dev-C++ isn't a C compiler. Judging by the name, I'd say it's a C++ compiler. Don't make the mistake of thinking that C and C++ aren't two different languages. And if you want to program in C, you need to use a C compiler (there may be a way to tell Dev-C++ to act as one). – Keith Thompson Oct 27 '11 at 2:51

@Dmitri is right about what caused the symptom you're seeing, but there are other problems in your code, some serious, some less so.

Here's a modified version of your program.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define ROW 5
#define RW 3
#define COL 10

int main(void)
{
    char ***ptr;
    char sh[10];
    ptr = malloc(ROW * sizeof *ptr);

    for (int i = 0; i < ROW; i++)
    {
        ptr[i] = malloc(RW * sizeof *(ptr[i]));
        printf("\t:\n");

        for (int j = 0; j < RW; j++)
        {
            ptr[i][j] = malloc(COL * sizeof *(ptr[i][j]));

            if (i==0 && j==0)
            {       
                //  *(*(ptr+ROW)+RW) = "kabul";
                ptr[i][j] = "zapac";
            }
            else
            {
                sh[0] = '0' + i;
                sh[1] = ',';
                sh[2] = '0' + j;
                sh[3] = '\0';
                // ptr[i][j] = sh;
                strcpy(ptr[i][j], sh);

            }

            // printf("\t%d%d = %s\n", i, j, ptr[i][j]);
            printf("\tptr[%d][%d] = \"%s\"\n", i, j, ptr[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < ROW; i++)
    {
        for (int j = 0; j < RW; j++)
        {
            // printf("\t%d%d %s\n", i, j, ptr[i][j]);
            printf("\tptr[%d][%d] = \"%s\"\n", i, j, ptr[i][j]);
        }
        printf("\n");
    }
    return 0;
}

The changes I've made are:

  1. Add #include <stdlib.h> to get the declaration of malloc(). This is not optional (though the compiler might let you get away with omitting it). In the absence of the #include <stdlib.h> a pre-C99 compiler will assume that malloc() returns an int; this results in undefined behavior. That means that arbitrarily bad things can happen -- or it might happen to work on some systems.

  2. Follow the usual convention of using all-caps names for macros.

  3. Add some whitespace (I find that it makes the code more legible, particularly having a space after each comma and around most operators).

  4. Make variables local rather than global.

  5. Declare loop control variables in their respective loops. This is a C99-specific feature, but your compiler probably supports it. (For gcc, use gcc -std=c99.)

  6. Fix the malloc() calls to compute the size from the size of what the pointer points to.

  7. Use the indexing operator rather than explicit pointer arithmetic. In general, x[y] means *(x+y), so, for example, *(*(ptr+i)+j) can be written simply as ptr[i][j].

  8. Use strcpy() to copy the string stored in sh into the string pointed to byptr[i][j]`, rather than just copying the pointer. (This fixes the problem that Dmitri already found; you should probably accept his answer, since he mentioned it first.)

  9. Modify the output produced by the printf calls so it's easier to see what's going on.

share|improve this answer
    
I intentionally used *(*(ptr+i)+j) instead of ptr[i][j] just to have it mind how it actually works... usually I use the usual. alongside dimitris answer, ur answer is handy too. thanks a lot – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 22:10

Because sh[10] is defined globally and while the first loop you are printing the current values of this array - the contents of this array are not preserved - changing on each iteration. For the second loop you are printing the last value written during the first loop (i.e. on the last iteration).

You'd better allocate on each iteration of the first loop:

       for(j=0;j<rw;j++)
       {
            *(*(ptr+i)+j)=(char *)malloc(col*sizeof(char *));
            char* psh = (char*)malloc(10*sizeof(char));
            if(i==0 && j==0)
            {       
               strcpy(psh, "zapac");
            }
            else
            {
                psh[0]=i+48;
                psh[1]=',';
                psh[2]=j+48;
                psh[3]='\0';
                *(*(ptr+i)+j)=psh;
            }

PS be aware of hard-coded 10-char size, possibly you need additional checks/assertions.

share|improve this answer
    
if sh[10] is assigned locally... i get same answer. btw, in the first block after i did assign sh values to ptr isn't the value of sh becomes irrelevant ? i.e. ptr are supposed to have all the data regardless of the condition of sh. isn't it ? – Maverick_Mrt Oct 23 '11 at 18:09
    
No matter how it's assigned, the point is that (*(ptr+i)+j) - all the same - they point to the same location which is sh[10]. You have to have different sh[10] per each i,j, i.e. ij instances in memory – pmod Oct 23 '11 at 18:34
    
See my correction, did it work for you? – pmod Oct 24 '11 at 7:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.