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I'm finding that i'm needing to compute large numbers to high precision. For example: 5422300.8452. What is the best way to store this data so that simple arithmetic operators can act on it? I've been trying to do combinations of Longs and Doubles but it gets complicated after a significant number of computations. I'm sure there is a simple solution, i'm just not so knowledgeable yet.

Ok Basically, I figured it out: My problem was that I wanted to keep 4 decimal places of precision but entering a high number started truncating digits. For example, I had this:

Double Remain = (double) Math.round((double quantity/12)*10000)/10000;

This works for smaller numbers but 900000000 still gets truncated to 7.5 something.

So I basically need to divide the numbers as long and then take the modulus of the 2 and divide it by the denominator, and round the result. Then add the 2.

It works!

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3 Answers 3

BigInteger and BigDecimal are the classes you're looking for. You won't be able to use simple arithmetic operators, though, because operator overloading doesn't exist in Java. But those classes have the required methods for all the simple operations.

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That works for the big numbers, but about the operations? –  cody Oct 23 '11 at 17:46
    
Lets say I want a method to take variable x and divide by 12. and i enter 45. If I make variable X a int, or long I lose the decimal. If I make it a double I can't enter 45, just 5. So what am I missing? –  cody Oct 23 '11 at 17:48
    
@cody What you're missing is the use of the BigDecimal or BigInteger classes. See the Javadoc. –  EJP Oct 24 '11 at 2:35

I'm not sure if I understand your followup question, but in order to divide, the code could look as follows:

BigDecimal x = new BigDecimal(45);
BigDecimal y = new BigDecimal(12);
BigDecimal result = x.divide(y);

Thats the downside described by JB Nizet, no operators can be used, so

BigDecimal x = new BigDecimal(45);
BigDecimal y = new BigDecimal(12);
BigDecimal result = x/y;

won't work.

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Basically, I understand that if you want the correct answer to 10/3 you get it by using: –  cody Oct 23 '11 at 18:02
    
Basically, I understand that if you want the correct answer to 10/3 you get it by using: 'double result = 10/3'. But what if you aren't using a literal for 10. What if 10 is stored as a "long" so that you have this: ' long x = 10; double result = (double) x/3' If you do this the answer is truncated to a long before it casts to a Double, so you end up loosing the decimal anyway. On the other hand, if x was a Double then you couldn't use a larger number for it. –  cody Oct 23 '11 at 18:10
    
Your questions don't make much sense to me. It doesn't get truncated to a long, and you don't lose the decimal. Double and double have the same precision. The latter is just a wrapper for the former. If you want doubles, use double and not long. –  JB Nizet Oct 23 '11 at 18:26
    
In fact, nothing is truncated. 10/3 == 3 because int/int == int. To avoid this problem, you can prematurely cast the x value: long x=10; double result = ((double)x)/3; or you take care, that the divisor isn't integer: double result = (double) x/3.0f; But I'm sure, that the second solution is not always precise. –  Philipp Wendt Oct 23 '11 at 18:36
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok Basically, I figured it out: My problem was that I wanted to keep 4 decimal places of precision but entering a high number started truncating digits. For example, I had this:

Double Remain = (double) Math.round((double quantity/12)*10000)/10000;

This works for smaller numbers but 900000000 still gets truncated to 7.5 something.

So I basically need to divide the numbers as long and then take the modulus of the 2 and divide.

Perhaps it would've helped if explained the purpose of what I was trying to do. I wanted the code to display a specific number of significant digits. If I use a Double as the variable to store user input to be divided, many digits might get truncated (depending on the number of resulting decimal places.) I needed a way to standardize the scope of the variable in the whole numbers while keeping the numbers precise to 4 decimal places.

In other words, I need to be able to handle the same size number regardless of how many decimal places the quotient takes.

In order to do this I take the user input, and divide it by the literal (12). Then I take the modulus the same way and divide the modulus by 12. I then piece the 2 together like so:

Quotient.toString() + Remainder.toString().substring(1)
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