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So the compiler tells me this is a deprecated conversion from a string-literal to char*:

 char* myString = "i like declaring strings like this";

Should I be worried about this? Is this the wrong way to do this?

I need to pass myString to a function that accepts a char* , who should I properly initialize the char* without this conversion?

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This shouldnt compile, since it isnt valid C++ anymore. Its was only supported in the beginning of C++ to make porting C-code to C++ easier (since C has no const). –  smerlin Oct 23 '11 at 17:50
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It shouldn't even compile. If you need to pass it to function that you are sure won't change the string you need to use const cast, its one of its correct uses:

functionName(const_cast<char *>("something"));

Or if you don't want the const cast, you can copy the string to the stack:

char str[] = "something";
functionName(str);
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Yes, You should be worried about it!

You should be declaring it as:

const char* myString = "i like declaring strings like this";

mystring is an pointer to the string literal "i like declaring strings like this", and the string literal resides in an memory space(Implementation Defined) which should not be modified by your program.
Modifying a string literal results in Undefined behavior.

Hence, C++03 Standard deprecated declaring string literals without the keyword const, This ensures that the string literal cannot be modified through the pointer.


Answer to your Question Edit, is already posted by @Benjamin in comments, simply quoting his answer:

Use an array:
char myString[] = "i like declaring strings like this";
That copies the literal into the array, and the copy can be modified

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In C++, it is illegal. In C++03 it is deprecated. –  Puppy Oct 23 '11 at 17:35
    
@DeadMG: Thanks that is apt. –  Alok Save Oct 23 '11 at 17:37
    
Just so our terms are clear, mystring is not a string literal, it is a pointer. "i like declaring strings like this" is a string literal. +1 anyway because you got the important part. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 23 '11 at 17:38
    
@BenjaminLindley: Thanks for pointing that subtle important detail out. –  Alok Save Oct 23 '11 at 17:42
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@weezybizzle: Use an array: -- char myString[] = "i like declaring strings like this"; -- That copies the literal into the array, and the copy can be modified. –  Benjamin Lindley Oct 23 '11 at 17:48
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