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In Numpy, I can concatenate two arrays end-to-end with np.append or np.concatenate:

>>> X = np.array([[1,2,3]])
>>> Y = np.array([[-1,-2,-3],[4,5,6]])
>>> Z = np.append(X, Y, axis=0)
>>> Z
array([[ 1,  2,  3],
       [-1, -2, -3],
       [ 4,  5,  6]])

But these make copies of their input arrays:

>>> Z[0,:] = 0
>>> Z
array([[ 0,  0,  0],
       [-1, -2, -3],
       [ 4,  5,  6]])
>>> X
array([[1, 2, 3]])

Is there a way to concatenate two arrays into a view, i.e. without copying? Would that require an np.ndarray subclass?

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Why do you want to have a view rather then a copy? –  Winston Ewert Oct 23 '11 at 21:03
    
@WinstonEwert: I have a long list of arrays on which I want to perform a single, global normalization. –  larsmans Oct 23 '11 at 21:09
    
list comprehension will be fast, too. –  cyborg Oct 23 '11 at 21:30
    
That doesn't answer the question, what's wrong with copying all those arrays? Basically, are you concerned about the cost of copying, or do you want to modify the original arrays? –  Winston Ewert Oct 23 '11 at 22:21
    
@WinstonEwert: the cost of copying is the problem; otherwise I could just concatenate them and replace the original arrays with views into the concatenation. Looks like that's what I'll have to do, though. –  larsmans Oct 23 '11 at 22:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

The memory belonging to a Numpy array must be contiguous. If you allocated the arrays separately, they are randomly scattered in memory, and there is no way to represent them as a view Numpy array.

If you know beforehand how many arrays you need, you can instead start with one big array that you allocate beforehand, and have each of the small arrays be a view to the big array (e.g. obtained by slicing).

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1  
Inconsequential remark: the memory of a view doesn't have to be contiguous but it probably has to be ordered in fixed strides (which is also not the case with a list of arrays). –  cyborg Oct 23 '11 at 22:11
    
Are you saying that even a subclass won't work? I know people use ndarray subclasses to work with mmap'd arrays, but I guess memory mappings are also contiguous... –  larsmans Oct 23 '11 at 22:12
1  
Yep, subclasses must also adhere to Numpy's memory model. (@cyborgs's comment above is also correct: the sub-arrays could also be ordered in memory with fixed strides, but also that can be obtained only by arranging things beforehand.) Careful reading of this page may shed some more light. –  pv. Oct 25 '11 at 16:21

Not really elegant at all but you can get close to what you want using a tuple to store pointers to the arrays. Now I have no idea how I would use it in the case but I have done things like this before.

>>> X = np.array([[1,2,3]])
>>> Y = np.array([[-1,-2,-3],[4,5,6]])
>>> z = (X, Y)
>>> z[0][:] = 0
>>> z
(array([[0, 0, 0]]), array([[-1, -2, -3],
       [ 4,  5,  6]]))
>>> X
array([[0, 0, 0]])
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Yes, but this won't give me the kind of NumPy indexing magic that I'd like to have. Thanks anyhow. –  larsmans Oct 28 '11 at 22:49

You may create an array of arrays, like:

>>> from numpy import *
>>> a = array([1.0, 2.0, 3.0])
>>> b = array([4.0, 5.0])
>>> c = array([a, b])
>>> c
array([[ 1.  2.  3.], [ 4.  5.]], dtype=object)
>>> a[0] = 100.0
>>> a
array([ 100.,    2.,    3.])
>>> c
array([[ 100.    2.    3.], [ 4.  5.]], dtype=object)
>>> c[0][1] = 200.0
>>> a
array([ 100.,  200.,    3.])
>>> c
array([[ 100.  200.    3.], [ 4.  5.]], dtype=object)
>>> c *= 1000
>>> c
array([[ 100000.  200000.    3000.], [ 4000.  5000.]], dtype=object)
>>> a
array([ 100.,  200.,    3.])
>>> # Oops! Copies were made...

The problem is that it creates copies on broadcast operations (sounds like a bug).

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