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Consider this program:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <cassert>

int main()
{
    std::istringstream stream( "-1" );
    unsigned short n = 0;
    stream >> n;
    assert( stream.fail() && n == 0 );
    std::cout << "can't convert -1 to unsigned short" << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I tried this on gcc (version 4.0.1 Apple Inc. build 5490) on OS X 10.5.6 and the assertion is true; it fails to convert -1 to an unsigned short.

In Visual Studio 2005 (and 2008) however, the assertion fails and the resulting value of n is the same as what you would expect from an compiler generated implicit conversion - i.e "-1" is 65535, "-2" is 65534, etc. But then it gets weird at "-32769" which converts to 32767.

Who's right and who's wrong here? (And what the hell's going on with -32769??)

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Can you check the default format flags set on istringstream on Mac using flags()? –  dirkgently Apr 24 '09 at 18:23
1  
as we don't seem to be getting a flood of answers, I've posted a slighly modified version on clc++m - groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++.moderated/browse_thread/… –  anon Apr 24 '09 at 21:47
    
Thanks Neil. Gosh, it gets complicated! I can see it's not so as easy as I had once hoped. –  Steve Folly Apr 26 '09 at 20:43
    
THis has been confirmed as a g++ bug - see gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=39802 –  anon Apr 27 '09 at 8:06
    
Nice! Just have to wait for Apple to catch up! Cheers Neil. –  Steve Folly Apr 27 '09 at 17:17
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The behaviour claimed by GCC in Max Lybbert's post is based on the tables om the C++ Standard that map iostream behaviour onto printf/scanf converters (or at least that;'s my reading). However, the scanf behaviour of g++ seems to be different from the istream behavior:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
using namespace std;;

int main()
{
    unsigned short n = 0;
    if ( ! sscanf( "-1", "%hu", &n ) ) {
        cout << "conversion failed\n";
    }
    else {
        cout << n << endl;
    }
}

actually prints 65535.

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THis reply on clc++m groups.google.com/group/comp.lang.c++.moderated/browse_thread/… confirms that C++ input is defined interms of C input - but comes to a rather different conclusion! –  anon Apr 25 '09 at 7:14
    
not sure i agree with that guy. strtoul says that the resulting value is negated. when 1 negated for unsigned short it is USHRT_MAX (modulo arithmetic), which is what MSVC returns correctly. Not sure why he says it should return 1 ? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 25 '09 at 12:04
    
No, I think he was a bit off-beam there. But what's your take on the original question? –  anon Apr 25 '09 at 12:27
    
i'm going to agree with that dude on the usenet, apart from the last part as i stated :) (posted an answer on that thread. let's see when ops release it :)) anyway, i just checked with gcc4.4, and its op>> also returns USHRT_MAX. So i suspect that bug is already fixed :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb Apr 25 '09 at 13:20
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First, reading the string "-1" as a negative number is locale dependent (it would be possible for a locale to identify negative numbers by enclosing them in parenthesis). Your default standard is the "classic" C locale:

By far the dominant use of locales is implicitly, in stream I/O. Each istream and ostream has its own locale. The locale of a stream is by default the global locale at the time of the stream’s creation (page 6). ...

Initially, the global locale is the standard C locale, locale::classic() (page 11).

According to the GCC guys, numeric overflow is allowed to fail the stream input operation (talking about negative numbers that overflowed a signed int):

[T]he behaviour of libstdc++-v3 is strictly standard conforming. ... When the read is attempted it does not fit in a signed int i, and it fails.

Thanks to another answer, a bug was filed and this behavior changed:

Oops, apparently we never parsed correctly negative values for unsigned. The fix is simple. ...

Fixed in mainline, will be fixed in 4.4.1 too.

Second, although integer overflow is generally predictable, I believe it's officially undefined behavior, so while I can't say why -32769" converts to 32767, I think it's allowed.

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+1 for locality tidbit. –  paxos1977 Apr 24 '09 at 23:36
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Try this code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <cassert>

int main()
{
    std::istringstream stream( "-1" );
    std::cout << "flags: " << (unsigned long)stream.flags() << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

I tried this on my VS2005:

flags: 513

and on codepad.org (which I think uses g++) this gives:

flags: 4098

This tells me that gcc uses a different default fmtflags. Since fmtflags control what conversions are possible you are getting different results.

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Clarification: codepad C++ compilation uses g++ 4.1.2. I think Mac's istringstream is likely to have the same or a similar fmtflags (but different from VS2005). –  dirkgently Apr 24 '09 at 18:33
    
Couldn't this just mean that the actual implementation values of fmtflags differ between the c++ implementations? –  anon Apr 24 '09 at 18:38
    
Yes, it can. What is your take on the source of the error? –  dirkgently Apr 24 '09 at 18:40
    
I don''t know which, if either is the error. The standard seems to say that this is locale dependent, and my knowledge of the ins & outs of locales is about zero :-( –  anon Apr 24 '09 at 18:43
    
Yes, I too have seen that it is locale dependent. Maybe tomorrow I will give this a try with a Mac proper! –  dirkgently Apr 24 '09 at 18:45
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