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In Javascript, I can assign a value like this so:

var i = p || 4

Obviously if p isn't defined it will resort to 4. Is there a more elegant version of this operation in Python than a try: / except: combo?

try:
    i = p
except:
    i = 4
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Why would you ever not have the variable exist? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 23 '11 at 22:59
    
It may or may not be defined yet in the process, because the process is run multiple times. –  Artur Sapek Oct 23 '11 at 23:12
4  
That was a rhetorical question. Treat it in the same vein as "Why would you eat 5 liters of Jello and then vomit it back up?" and "Why would you drive your rocket car into the face of a cliff?". –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Oct 23 '11 at 23:14
    
Well thanks for the condescending bull shit. I'm reading the first field of the last line of a csv file with linecache, and when I wrap that in int(). If the csv file hasn't had rows added yet, the last line is the line with the heading "ID", which turns up an error. It's not that it's nonexistent, just incompatible with what I'm doing. Even if this isn't good coding, I'm learning and you should keep your rhetorical questions to yourself if you don't intend to help me. :) –  Artur Sapek Oct 23 '11 at 23:22
1  
Not asking for a mentor just a specific comparison between two languages. –  Artur Sapek Oct 23 '11 at 23:29

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

People sometime use Python's or-operator for this purpose:

def f(p=None):
    i = p or 4
    ...

The relies on a "unique to Python" aspect of the or-operator to return the value that makes the expression true (rather than just returning True or False).

Another option that affords more flexibility is to use a conditional expression:

def f(p=None):
    i = p if p is not None else 4
    ...

If you just want to check to see if a variable is already defined, a try/except is the cleanest approach:

try:
    i = p
except NameError:
    pass

That being said, this would be atypical for Python and may be a hint that there is something wrong with the program design.

It is better to simply initialize a variable to a place-holder value such as None. In this regard, Python's style is somewhat different from Javascript.

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Interesting, thank you. –  Artur Sapek Oct 23 '11 at 23:25

You could use i = locals().get('p', 4), but I strongly recommend against it. Structure your code so you don't need to refer to variables that might or might not be there.

The only instance where I use this pattern in Javascript is to fake namespaces with global objects when I don't want to depend on my script files being included in the right order. Since Python has a proper module system, I can't imagine where this would be necessary.

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This would work but it is fragile and not Pythonic. The idiomatic approaches are to use either the or-operator or a conditional expression. –  Raymond Hettinger Oct 23 '11 at 23:14
    
@RaymondHettinger: If I understand the OP, he doesn't want to check if p is None, he wants to check if the local (or global) variable has even been defined. –  millimoose Oct 23 '11 at 23:16
    
If so, then try/except is probably the best bet (or at least it is a more Pythonic approach). Also, I question the use-case -- it isn't typical for Python programs to need to check if a variable is already defined, so wanting to make such a check could be a hint that the program design needs to be improved. –  Raymond Hettinger Oct 23 '11 at 23:20
    
@RaymondHettinger: Yes, my answer just says how to do this without try..except if you really really really really want/need to. The other answers cover possible alternatives without this ugliness well enough. –  millimoose Oct 23 '11 at 23:24

You could ensure that p is initialized to a sentinel value (usually None) and then test for its presence:

p = None
...
i = p if p is not None else 4

This is necessary because Python has no way to define variables without assigning to them first. In Javascript, a variable can be declared with e.g. var p; and until it is assigned to, it will evaluate to the special value undefined.

So with Javascript, a sentinel value can be implicitly created, whilst with Python it must always be explicitly created.

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1  
i = p or 4 would be neater. –  Blair Oct 23 '11 at 23:16
1  
@Blair. But what if p == 0 ? –  ekhumoro Oct 23 '11 at 23:17
    
You'd think with the number of times I've fallen into that trap I'd remember it! In general your way is more robust, but if the default is zero, or the input is not allowed to be zero, then the concise way works too. Depends on the situation. –  Blair Oct 24 '11 at 7:46

As Inerdia and Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams pointed out, your variables should always be initialized when you access them. If a variable will not always get a value, you can initialize it to None and then use the following code which is similar to your Javascript:

i = p or 4

Note that you should only use this if valid values for p always evaluate to True in a Boolean context, according to Python's Boolean rules.

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The question and initial assertions are misleading.

Assuming that there is no window.p property and p is not a variable (and there is no with in effect) then this will result in a ReferenceError in JavaScript at run-time:

var i = p || 4

Python works in the same manner for this example and the use of try/except is superfluous. JavaScript is slightly different in that var is hoisted to the top of a function which also means var i = i || 2 will work in JavaScript (as it is equivalent of var i; ..; i = i || 2). However, in general, a variable must be in existence before it is used.

Thus, or (Python), as pointed out, is the "equivalent" of || (JavaScript), differences of var (or lack thereof) aside. Please note that Python has a slightly different notion of false-y values than JavaScript ..

Happy coding.

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