Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

lately I've been toying around with templates and stumbled upon the following problem. I am implementing the CRTP pattern like this:

template<typename derived_t>
struct protocol_object
{
    ...
};

struct data_object : public protocol_object<data_object>
{
    ...
};

I now would like to match instances of class protocol_object in a member template function, while still accepting non CRTP-types:

struct consumer_impl
{
    template<typename derived_t>
    void match(protocol_object<derived_t> &value)
    {
       std::cout << "protocol_class";
    };

    template<typename T>
    void match(T &value)
    {
       std::cout << "any other type";
    };
}

Unfortunately only the second version is ever called. Apparently match(protocol_object<derived_t> &value) is not considered or rejected in favour of the more general form match(T &value).

data_object object;
double value;
consumer_impl consumer;

consumer.match(value);  // yields "any other type" OK
consumer.match(object); // also yields "any other type" but want "protocol_class"

Is there a way out of this?

Thanks for any hints. Arne

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This isn't related to CRTP. It's a general case of the following:

  • Design a template function, such that all derived classes use a particular specialization.

The issue is that T& value is an exact match for Derived&, while Base& is an inexact match. So we shall make the general form a worse match:

struct conversion_required { conversion_required(int) {} };

template<typename derived_t>
void match_impl(protocol_object<derived_t> &value, int)
{
   std::cout << "protocol_class";
};

template<typename T>
void match_impl(T &value, conversion_required)
{
   std::cout << "any other type";
};

template<typename T>
void match(T& value)
{
    return match_impl(value, 0);
}

Now the specialization, requiring an upcast, is a better match than the general template, requiring a user-defined conversion.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I will try that tomorrow. I was thinking in the same line, but was hoping that there was a solution that didn't require a line similar to conversion_required(int) {} for each "general" type. –  Arne Oct 24 '11 at 0:05
    
@Arne: The same conversion_required class can be used as often as you like. You could even use const char* and std::string for the purpose. –  Ben Voigt Oct 24 '11 at 0:12
    
now I see, thanks! –  Arne Oct 24 '11 at 5:52
    
This solution doesn't reliably work for me. pastebin.com/RHPqX6uC To summarize, gcc 4.8.0 compiles but warns: "ISO C++ says that these are ambiguous, even though the worst conversion for the first is better than the worst conversion for the second: [enabled by default]", and clang tip-ish errors: "call to 'match_impl' is ambiguous". Pastebin link includes the exact source I'm compiling. Any chance you could post a working solution? (I'm attempting a fix, but I'm weak on C++ overload semantics and might not divine the solution.) –  Jeff Walden Jul 9 '13 at 0:04

Overload resolution is performed based on the static type, since it is a compile-time compiler decision. Try this:

consumer.match(static_cast<protocol_object<data_object>&>(object));
share|improve this answer

The second function is a better match, as no conversion is required for it, whereas the first function requires a derived-to-base conversion.

You can use boost to overcome this:

template <class T>
void
match (typename boost::enable_if_c
             <boost::is_base_of<protocol_object<T>,T>::value, T>::type& t)
{
    std::cout << "protocol_class";
}

template <class T>
void
match (typename boost::disable_if_c
             <boost::is_base_of<protocol_object<T>,T>::value, T>::type& t)
{
    std::cout << "any other type";
}

This will work for all classes T derived from protocol_object<T>, but not for protocol_object<T> itself. You can add another overload for it (basically, reuse your first match function), or modify the condition in enable_if so that it matches protocol_object<T> too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.