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im trying to understand the order of Constructor and Destructor calls when overwriting an object.

My code is :

class A 
{
public: 
   A(int n): x(n)
   { cout << "A(int " << n << ") called" << endl; }

   ~A( )
   { cout << "~A( ) with A::x = " << x << endl; }

private: 
   int x; 
};

int main( ) 
{
    cout << "enter main\n"; 
    int x = 14;  
    A z(11); 
    z = A(x); 
    cout << "exit main" << endl; 
}

--

The output is :

enter main
A(int 11) called
A(int 14) called
~A( ) with A::xx = 14
exit main
~A( ) with A::xx = 14

--

Why is A::xx = 14 when the destructor is called? Shouldn't it be 11?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Why should it be 11? You reassign z to A(14), so it's 14 at the end.

(After your edit: You also see the destructor of the temporary A(14) object that gets destroyed at the end of the assignment.)

share|improve this answer
    
But the first printing of x happens during the destructor, so if the first instance of A hasn't been destroyed yet, shouldn't x still be 11 –  Zimbriterican Oct 23 '11 at 23:57
    
You realize that each object keeps a separate copy of the member variable? You don't have a reference or a static, just an ordinary member. –  Kerrek SB Oct 24 '11 at 0:01
    
The first ~A( ) with A::xx = 14 is the destructor of the temporary, because it has finished changing z to be 14. Then main ends, and z is destructed, showing the second ~A( ) with A::xx = 14. –  Mooing Duck Oct 24 '11 at 0:01
    
I see. Thanks for clearing this up for me. –  Zimbriterican Oct 24 '11 at 0:05

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