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I have implemented the ability to load 3DS files into an OpenGL program of mine, and run into a slight problem. All of the vertices are placed properly, and the faces are drawn, but the issue is that most(or all) of the vertices seem to retain a connection to one or two vertices, creating a large number of extra edges. Anyone run into this issue before or have a suggestion on how I can fix it?

The following block of code is the loop I use to draw the faces. It loops through one vertex at a time, skipping every fourth value (in theory) as they are unused face modifiers.

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
for(int x = 1; x < 4*numberOfTriangles+1; x++)
{
    //Face bit modifiers not needed, skip em.
    if(tLoop == 4)
    {
        tLoop = 0;
        continue;
    }
    else
    {
        glVertex3f(Vertices[Triangles[x]*3],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+1],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+2]);
        tLoop++;
    }
}
glEnd();

This next is an image representing the problem I am having. http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v298/Reaperc89/Pistol.jpg

share|improve this question
    
This is hard to troubleshoot without knowing exactly what the mesh data is in your 3ds file. It could be that your mesh is stored as indexed triangles (ie. as a set of indices (where each set of 3 indices references 3 verts of a tri) and a set of vertices). – axon Oct 24 '11 at 1:23
    
The 3ds file mesh data stores vertices one after another, while face data is stored as 3 indices which represent vertices. For instance with a cube, the three indices for face one might be 4, 0, and 7. These would correlate to the 5th, 1st, and 8th vertices in the vertex list. There is a fourth value that is also a part of the face data, but they are bit flag modifiers for the faces that are not necessary to construct the geometry. – Evan Oct 24 '11 at 1:28
2  
Why are you starting with x=1 instead of x=0? Also you can skip if every forth element with if (x % 4 == 3) rather than having a separate variable, though I'd recommend just not reading the values you don't want (or unroll the loop so each iteration draws one triangle). – user786653 Oct 24 '11 at 6:05
    
I don't understand the (4 * numberoftriangles + 1). If they're indexed triangles, 3 indices make up a triangle, so why isn't your loop (3 * numberoftriangles). Also as user786653 says, why do you start indexing at 1? Also why put tLoop == 4 in a loop? Why not iterate number of triangles, emitting 3 vertices inside the loop, one for each triangle. – Robinson Oct 24 '11 at 8:52
    
What language are you in? – Puppy Oct 25 '11 at 15:16
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The fact that glBegin and glEnd are outside the loop is absolutely no problem. Drawing triangles using every vertex one after the other is just the correct way. It will build a triangle form every 3 consecutive vertices, which is what you want.

Your problem was, that you increased tLoop inside the else block, and therefore actually skipped every fifth index, instead of every fourth. So unrolling prevented it, but it has nothing to do with glBegin/glEnd not working outside of the loop. But like said in the comment, you don't need the tLoop anyway, as you can just use x instead:

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
for(int x = 1; x < 4*numberOfTriangles+1; x++)
    if(x % 4)   //works if x starts at 1, though I don't know why x has to start at 1
        glVertex3f(Vertices[Triangles[x]*3],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+1],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+2]);
glEnd();

or even better unroll the loop:

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
for(int x = 1; x < 4*numberOfTriangles+1; x+=4) {
    glVertex3f(Vertices[Triangles[x]*3],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+1],Vertices[(Triangles[x]*3)+2]);
    glVertex3f(Vertices[Triangles[x+1]*3],Vertices[(Triangles[x+1]*3)+1],Vertices[(Triangles[x+1]*3)+2]);
    glVertex3f(Vertices[Triangles[x+2]*3],Vertices[(Triangles[x+2]*3)+1],Vertices[(Triangles[x+2]*3)+2]);
}
glEnd();

But placing the glBegin/glEnd inside the loop is the silliest thing you can do. In fact if you already use a vertex/index array based representation, it should be quite easy to port your rendering code to vertex arrays, which are much faster than immediate mode, more so when powered by VBOs.

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Ah, ok I see what you are getting at now, thanks for the feedback. – Evan Oct 25 '11 at 16:26

Figured out my own problem. Notice how the begin and end blocks appear outside of the loop. The program was trying to draw triangles using every vertex in the mesh, one after another. Thus it kinda created one giant mess. I changed to placing three vertices at a time(one face), and I placed the begin/end blocks inside the loop, and changed the loop to increment by 4 each time, allowing me to skip the face data.

Just in case anyone was curious.

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That is just about the slowest possible way you could render triangles. Using glBegin/glEnd is the old deprecated way to start with. Doing that for each triangle is just pathologically bad. I urge you to spend more time trying to understand where you are going wrong. – Alan Oct 24 '11 at 23:46
    
I am new to openGL, and didn't realize there was an alternative method to doing it. Though now that you mention it I can look into it a bit more. – Evan Oct 24 '11 at 23:55
    
No, that was not your problem, see my answer. – Christian Rau Oct 25 '11 at 15:05

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