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I was thinking about how wasteful of memory some classes are and I'm wondering if there is a build setting that says to the compiler

Hey Compiler,

These assemblies in this solution aren't going to be used by anyone else. I promise. So feel free to strip out class members that aren't used to save memory!

Cheers,

The Build Settings

For example, say we have this class

class Foo {
    Int32 Woo;
    Int32 Hoo;
    SomeReallyBigClassThatNeverGetsReferenceInThisAssembly Wasted;
}

Is there a setting to turn it into this in the output assembly?

class Foo {
    Int32 Woo;
    Int32 Hoo;
}

And can this be done with .NET Framework classes?

EDIT: I should have been more clear. I am interested in whether or not a feature like what I describe above can be used with .NET Framework assemblies (assemblies I don't have the source for).

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so why not remove the reference in code? –  Alastair Pitts Oct 24 '11 at 2:29
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4 Answers

It won't get jitted if it's never used. What's the problem?

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It sounds like he's concerned more about memory. –  Matthew Flaschen Oct 24 '11 at 2:32
    
The code still takes up memory and disk storage. Might not be an issue if it's just sitting on your computer, but if you have to distribute several extra MBs over the internet, or plan to run on memory-constrained systems, I could see how that might be an issue. In that case, it might just make sense to use something like R# to find the unused code and then either add a [Conditional("DEBUG")] attribute, or outright delete it (if it's not being used, why have it at all?). –  siride Oct 24 '11 at 2:33
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You can declare all of your types as internal (and compile into a single assembly), which makes it obvious to the compiler that they will not be used outside your project.

internal class Foo {
    Int32 Woo;
    Int32 Hoo;
    SomeReallyBigClassThatNeverGetsReferenceInThisAssembly Wasted;
}

I have no idea if the Microsoft .NET compiler currently takes advantage of this to eliminate all code relating to unused members. However, I doubt it.

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This sounds like a job for preprocessor symbols. What you can do is define different configurations for whether or not you want to include said code (class, method, whatever).

Next you edit the build properties for the project and define a conditional compilation symbol. This is located under "Build" on the project settings page. Then you update your code like so:

#if !MyConfigSymbol
            public SomeReallyBigClassThatNeverGetsReferenceInThisAssembly Wasted
#endif

These symbols are configuration dependent so you will need to make sure you are targeting the correct configuration when you build to get it to include/exclude correctly.

MSDN #if: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4y6tbswk(v=VS.100).aspx

MSDN config manager: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/kwybya3w(v=VS.100).aspx

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That would be a great solution if I had the source code. I should have been more clear in saying that I'm looking for this behavior with assemblies that I don't have the source to, but am using in my project. –  Nick Strupat Oct 24 '11 at 3:32
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That's why there exists FxCop and Gendarme,

http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=6544

http://www.mono-project.com/Gendarme

https://github.com/unintelligible/GendarmeMsBuild

Add them to your build process, and you will see lots of potential problems inside your code base, including the one you just mentioned.

The compiler should be as light as possible, so I don't think your request should be treated as a feature of C# compiler.

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