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  struct {              /* Fileheader */
    uchar file_version[4];
    uchar options[2];
    uchar header_length[2];
    uchar state_info_length[2];
    uchar base_info_length[2];
    uchar base_pos[2];
    uchar key_parts[2];         /* Key parts */
    uchar unique_key_parts[2];      /* Key parts + unique parts */
    uchar keys;             /* number of keys in file */
    uchar uniques;          /* number of UNIQUE definitions */
    uchar language;         /* Language for indexes */
    uchar max_block_size_index;     /* max keyblock size */
    uchar fulltext_keys;
    uchar not_used;                     /* To align to 8 */
  } header;

The above is extracted from MySQL source,

why bother to align to 8?

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3 Answers 3

It's an optimization to allow more efficient access to the structures in memory by the CPU.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Data_structure_alignment

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But its already done by all compilers automatically –  Dani Oct 24 '11 at 2:59
    
Why will aligning to 8 make it more efficient?Any more explanations? –  new_perl Oct 24 '11 at 3:01
    
@Dani - Not necessarily, if the struct contains only uchar members (I presume that uchar is defined with something like typedef unsigned char uchar;). –  Chris Lutz Oct 24 '11 at 3:01
    
I doubt it, in this case. Compilers can pad on their own; more often they need to be told not to pad. More likely it's there for compatibility across compilers to ensure that the structure size is always the same. Perhaps this structure is part of a public interface or an on-disk structure. –  rlibby Oct 24 '11 at 3:03
2  
@new_perl: it looks like they intend to reinterpret things like file_version as int. (e.g. int version = (int*)(void*)(file_version)) –  Dani Oct 24 '11 at 3:10
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Reason 1: Address computations are faster and smaller.

On x86 as well as some other architectures, it is more efficient to access elements of an array if the element size is a "nice, round number". For the definition of "nice, round number", learn x86 assembly. But you can see the effects of accessing arrays with differently sized elements in assembly for the following code:

struct s { char c[N]; };
int func(struct s *p, int i) { return p[i].c[0]; }

When N is 23 (size of the above structure without padding):

leaq    (%rsi,%rsi,2), %rax
salq    $3, %rax
subq    %rsi, %rax
movsbl  (%rax,%rdi),%eax

When N is 24 (size of the above structure with padding):

leaq    (%rsi,%rsi,2), %rax
movsbl  (%rdi,%rax,8),%eax

When N is 32 (size of the above structure with additional padding):

salq    $5, %rsi
movsbl  (%rsi,%rdi),%eax

Notice how complicated the code is for accessing an element in an array with 23-byte elements.

Reason 2: For on-disk structures, it allows other elements in file to be accessed with aligned loads and stores.

It looks like the structure appears on disk. With padding, a 32-bit word can appear directly after the structure and be aligned. This makes it faster to access -- the compiler automatically does this for structures in memory, but you need to do it manually for structures on disk. Some architectures will even crash if you try to access unaligned data.

unsigned char *data = ...;
header *h = (header *) data;
do_something_with(h);
uint32_t x = *(uint32_t *) (data + sizeof(header));

The above code will crash a SPARC if sizeof(header) is not a multiple of 4, and on x86 it will be slower unless sizeof(header) is not a multiple of 4.

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@new_perl: You can assume whatever you want, because you are designing the data format you get to choose what data types are used. For example, some file formats always align to 2 or 4 byte boundaries. And 8 byte alignment is good enough for such a wide range of scalar data types that you don't have to worry about what data type you'll use. –  Dietrich Epp Oct 24 '11 at 4:38
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If the header struct is in an array, all elements of the array will be aligned in the same manner. Otherwise, that would not be the case. You can take a look at the code / output below to verify that.

If Dani, in their comment, is correct that the users of this intend to cast things like file_version to a uint32_t, then this kind of alignment would be very important.

Some code

#include <stdio.h>

struct padded {
    unsigned char file_version[4];
    unsigned char options[2];
    unsigned char header_length[2];
    unsigned char state_info_length[2];
    unsigned char base_info_length[2];
    unsigned char base_pos[2];
    unsigned char key_parts[2];
    unsigned char unique_key_parts[2];
    unsigned char keys;
    unsigned char uniques;
    unsigned char language;
    unsigned char max_block_size_index;
    unsigned char fulltext_keys;
    unsigned char not_used;
};

struct unpadded {
    unsigned char file_version[4];
    unsigned char options[2];
    unsigned char header_length[2];
    unsigned char state_info_length[2];
    unsigned char base_info_length[2];
    unsigned char base_pos[2];
    unsigned char key_parts[2];
    unsigned char unique_key_parts[2];
    unsigned char keys;
    unsigned char uniques;
    unsigned char language;
    unsigned char max_block_size_index;
    unsigned char fulltext_keys;
};

int main() {
    printf("size padded:      %lu\n", sizeof(struct padded));
    printf("size unpadded:    %lu\n", sizeof(struct unpadded));

    printf("size padded[2]:   %lu\n", sizeof(struct padded[2]));
    printf("size unpadded[2]: %lu\n", sizeof(struct unpadded[2]));
}

The output

size padded:      24
size unpadded:    23
size padded[2]:   48
size unpadded[2]: 46
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