Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I find out what file is importing a particular file in python?

Consider the following example:

#a.py
import cmn
....

#b.py
import cmn
...

#cmn.py
#Here, I want to know which file (a.py or b.py)
#is importing this one.
#Is it possible to do this?
...

All the files a.py, b.py and cmn.py are in the same directory.

Why do I want to do this?
In C/C++, they have include feature. What i want to do can illuminate by the C/C++ code.

//a.cpp
....
#define SOME_STUFF   ....
#include "cmn.h"

//b.cpp
...
#define SOME_STUFF   ....

#include "cmn.h"

//cmn.h
//Here, I'll define some functions/classes that will use the symbol define
//in the a.cpp or b.cpp
...
....code refer to the SOME_STUFF.....

In C/C++, we can use this method to reuse sourecode.

Now return to my python code.
When a.py import cmn.py, i hope to run cmn.py and the cmn.py will refer to the symbol defined in the a.py.
When b.py import cmn.py, i hope to run cmn.py and the cmn.py will refer to the symbol defined in the b.py.

share|improve this question
3  
Libraries shouldn't depend on who imports them, so it really shouldn't matter. –  Michael Aaron Safyan Oct 24 '11 at 4:34
3  
@MichaelAaronSafyan is right. It can be done, though, as I demonstrate here: stackoverflow.com/questions/7025538/… . However... what is the real problem that you are trying to solve? –  Johnsyweb Oct 24 '11 at 4:37
    
What are you trying to achieve? Maybe there is an alternative way to achieve it without coupling your files like this. –  Burhan Ali Oct 24 '11 at 4:39
    
@Yuncy: Do you want all imports of cmn.py to run some code in cmn.py? I'm asking this question because the normal way of operation is that Python only imports modules once, so cmn.py normally only gets one chance of knowing who does import cmn. Tavis Rudd's answer might be the solution, if you want to catch every import cmn. –  EOL Oct 24 '11 at 8:24
    
@EOL You're right. I want to do this. I have improved my question according to the feedback. –  Yuncy Oct 24 '11 at 14:50
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The namedtuple code in the collections module has an example of how (and when) to do this:

#cmn.py
import sys
print 'I am being imported by', sys._getframe(1).f_globals.get('__name__')

One limitation of this approach is that the outermost module is always named __main__. If that is the case, the name of the outermost module can be determined from sys.argv[0].

A second limitation is that if the code using sys._getframe is in the module scope it is only executed on the first import of cmn.py. You'd need to call a function of some sort after imports if you want to monitor all imports of the module.

share|improve this answer
    
Note the print statement is only executed on the very first import of the module. If you want to catch every import, you need to either call a function from cmn.py after each import or use an import hook. –  Tavis Rudd Oct 24 '11 at 15:19
    
How would one implement something similar for py3? –  Rizo Feb 24 at 12:50
add comment

Well, this is a kind of bizarre thing to do. You haven't explained why you want to know what is importing your module, so I can't actually help you solve your problem. You also haven't explained how or when you want to know the importing module.

def who_imports(studied_module):
    for loaded_module in sys.modules.values():
        for module_attribute in dir(loaded_module):
            if getattr(loaded_module, module_attribute) is studied_module:
                yield loaded_module

This will give you an iterator over all the modules which use your module as a top-level object. It won't find modules that do from cmn import *, and the list will change over time.

>>> import os
>>> for m in who_imports(os):
...     print m.__name__
... 
site
__main__
posixpath
genericpath
posixpath
linecache
share|improve this answer
    
It also looks like it wouldn't handle 'import foo as bar'. –  Tavis Rudd Oct 24 '11 at 5:12
    
@TavisRudd: it actually does handle import foo as bar: who_imports(foo) will return the module that did the import. This is because the test is made on module objects (via is module), and not on module names. Note that the reported module names are the original names, though (the program that contains the import will yield name foo if who_imports(bar) is called). –  EOL Oct 24 '11 at 8:11
    
@DietrichEpp: +1: Clean way of answering the question. The who_imports() function could be optimized, though. For instance, many sys.modules.values() are None and could be skipped. –  EOL Oct 24 '11 at 8:26
add comment

You'd need to install an import hook that tracks all imports. See PEP 302 and http://docs.python.org/dev/py3k/library/importlib.html. However, as the comments above point out, there is probably a better way to structure your code.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.