Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am writing a function in Java for an Android application that uses a StringBuilder to generate all permutations of a string.

Whenever the function is run, the program instantly terminates, and the DDMS (Dalvic Virtual Machine debugging tool) claims a stack overflow within my function.

private void reorder(String reorder_this, StringBuilder in_this){

    for(int i = 0; i < reorder_this.length(); i++)
    {
        if(i == reorder_this.length())
        {
            in_this.append(System.getProperty("line.separator"));
        }
        else
        {
            in_this.append(reorder_this.charAt(i));
            reorder(reorder_this.substring(0, i) + reorder_this.substring(i), in_this);
        }
    }
}

You can see that I have taken a recursive approach to this problem, which I believe will end up filling the string builder with all possible permutations of the inputted string each followed by the newline character.

Does anybody have an idea about what could be causing the stack overflow?

share|improve this question
1  
Have you traced the execution through with a small string, like "ABC"? (I mean traced "by hand", or in a pinch, logging... but "playing computer" can really help.) – Dave Newton Oct 24 '11 at 5:01
    
I found a much more efficient solution in nested for loops. I had been using scheme a lot recently, and had been stuck in the recursive paradigm. – Nexxuss Nov 18 '11 at 4:25
    
Non-tail-recursive functions are often less efficient; recursion often shines because of how it communicates, not necessarily how it performs. – Dave Newton Nov 18 '11 at 4:30
up vote 5 down vote accepted

In short, your function cannot terminate unless your string has a length of 0.

Your method begins with setting i to 0 and testing whether i is less than length of your first argument. If it is (which will be the case for all but empty strings), you immediately recurse because you can not be strictly less than the length and equal to the length. In your recursive call, you pass in a string of exactly the same length (indeed, the same exact string, as Thilo points out). This indicates a second problem with the algorithm: recursive algorithms should operate on "smaller" arguments for each recursive call.

It will not take long to get a StackOverflowException here. Each recursive call pushes a new stack frame.

share|improve this answer
    
True, reorder_this.substring(0, i) + reorder_this.substring(i) will just be the same as reorder_this again. – Thilo Oct 24 '11 at 5:03
    
It's not even reached in that case. 0 is never < 0. – EJP Oct 24 '11 at 9:41
    
@EJP, I think my claim is correct because the method can only terminate if the for-loop completes. That is what I was calling the "base case" although my terminology is probably confusing because it is easy to take the "base case" as the content of the if-clause. Because the OP recurses before advancing in the for loop, the "base case" of finishing the loop is never reached unless the original string is empty. So yes, the true-part of the if-statement is never reached, as I believe you are pointing out. But that true-part is not what I would call a base-case because it is in a loop. – Ray Toal Oct 24 '11 at 13:57
    
Ah, I see. The my problem is rooted in my misunderstanding of the substring function. It looks like the second argument to it actually indicates the index before the one specified. – Nexxuss Oct 24 '11 at 21:47
1  
@Ray Toal it is the base case because it is the one that doesn't recurse. Looping has nothing to do with it. – EJP Oct 24 '11 at 21:54

The cause of any stack overflow in Java is infinite recursion.

private void reorder(String reorder_this, StringBuilder in_this){
    for(int i = 0; i < reorder_this.length(); i++)
    {
        if(i == reorder_this.length())
        {

This block is unreachable, by construction. So your termination condition is never met.

share|improve this answer

I think the problem is this line:

reorder(reorder_this.substring(0, i) + reorder_this.substring(i), in_this);

reorder_this.substring(0, i) + reorder_this.substring(i) will product a string equivalent to reorder-this

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.